Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have method that as follows

public int TranslateOOV(string word, Stream logStream)
{
StreamWriter writer = new StreamWriter(logStream);

//Do some logging
//dont close the writer and leave the caller close the stream
}

I do not close the StreamWriter as the caller should close the inner stream, does this cause memoryleak?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Just for fun I cracked open the decompiler to look at what Dispose does on a StreamWriter (thinking perhaps the underlying stream is the only resource needed disposed). Here is what came out:

protected override void Dispose(bool disposing)
{
    try
    {
        if (this.stream != null)
        {
            if (disposing || (this.Closable || this.stream as __ConsoleStream))
            {
                this.Flush(true, true);
                if (this.mdaHelper != null)
                {
                    GC.SuppressFinalize(this.mdaHelper);
                }
            }
        }
    }
    finally
    {
        if (this.Closable)
        {
            if (this.stream != null)
            {
                if (disposing)
                {
                    this.stream.Close();
                }
                this.stream = null;
                this.byteBuffer = null;
                this.charBuffer = null;
                this.encoding = null;
                this.encoder = null;
                this.charLen = 0;
                base.Dispose(disposing);
            }
        }
    }
}

A bit wordy, but I think what this is telling us is that disposing the stream takes care of the only Disposable resource used by the StreamWriter. The byteBuffer and charBuffer fields are arrays, encoding and encoder are not disposable, and the base Dispose is virtual, so the Stream is the only thing that will cause problems if it is not cleaned up.

I think this also makes it clear that if you are wanting to log the contents of the stream, and leave it in a usable state afterwards, then you most defiantly do not want to dispose your StreamWriter, because that will dispose the Stream (Close calls Dispose(true)). You also want to make sure you reset the position of the Stream since you will no doubt change it by reading the contents. Of course that also means that you probably want to check the CanSeek property on the Stream and make sure that once you read the contents you will be able to return the position to where it was before.

share|improve this answer
    
I was worried about the leak, the design provides what you'r saying exactly –  Ahmed Said Jun 1 '11 at 11:17

As a best practice you should close it as soon as you no longer need it. However, garbage collection should mark it for cleanup when it leaves the local function scope.

share|improve this answer
    
You missed the point about the caller cleaning up the Stream. –  Henk Holterman May 31 '11 at 22:15
    
Ah, yep, I sure did. I didn't catch that. Sorry for the misunderstanding. –  BAKeele Jun 1 '11 at 16:15

The stream will surely be disposed by the garbage collector if it is not referenced anymore because it implements IDisposable.
The problem with letting the garbage collector dispose it is that the moment when it is disposed is not deterministic and depends on several conditions.
So in theory it won't cause a memory leak but it will make your application use more resources during more time which can be highly inefficient.

share|improve this answer
    
The caller closes the stream. The writer holds no (other) resources. –  Henk Holterman May 31 '11 at 18:55

This isn't my strong suit, but yes you should put the StreamWriter into a Using() block, disposing the streamwriter should not dispose the stream. If it does dispose the stream, you'd want to return the streamwriter reference so it could be cleaned up further down.

Edit: Great haphazard coding on Microsoft. The StreamWriter will not dispose the stream as you can directly see on the answer from @ckramer it does Close the stream. Digging into the close method http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.io.stream.close.aspx

This method calls Dispose, specifying true to release all resources. You do not have to specifically call the Close method. Instead, ensure that every Stream object is properly disposed.

Great to see Microsoft directly ignoring their own statements. It gets better still.

Notes to Implementers

In derived classes, do not override the Close method, instead, put all of the Stream cleanup logic in the Dispose method.

This makes absolutely no sense. So not only do they ignore their first statements, they create a class that violates the Open-Closed principle giving you the capability of modification of the class in ways that can lead to unintended scenarios. For a statement like this, Close should absolutely not be virtual, or they should have fixed whatever reasoning went into this consideration.

share|improve this answer
    
Blind DV? Argue your lot. –  Chris Marisic Jun 1 '11 at 15:14
    
Simply not true. –  Jay Sullivan Mar 21 '13 at 14:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.