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Recently I have come across a curious pattern in some code. We know that there is a time and a place for everything, especially when it comes to the issue of ABCs and interfaces, but this just seems redundant to me.

  // This describes a person....
  public interface IPerson
  {
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public string LastName { get; set; }
    public int BasePay { get; set; }
    public string Address { get; set; }
  }

  // And so does this, but it also uses the interface....
  public abstract class Person : IPerson
  {
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public string LastName { get; set; }
    public int BasePay { get; set; }
    public string Address { get; set; }
  }

  // This uses both ?!
  public class CoalMiner : Person, IPerson
  {
    public CoalMiner()
    {
      BasePay = 10000;
    }
  }

Can anybody think of what the specific advantage of using both and ABC and an interface that define the same members be?

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possible duplicate of C# - What should I use, an Interface, Abstract class, or Both? –  bzlm May 31 '11 at 19:04
    
not quite a duplicate, sort of in the same vein though... –  A.R. May 31 '11 at 19:11
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12 Answers

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Personally, I feel that using an interface to describe a "noun", such as a person, it typically a poor design choice.

Interfaces should be used for contracts - all people are always a Person, so an abstract class makes more sense here. Interfaces could be added for behaviors attached to specific types of people, or to allow a Person to be used in a certain way by fulfilling a contract (ie: Person : IComparable<Person>).

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There are a lot of interface uses to describe nouns. System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations.IValidatableObject for example. It could be an abstract under your thought process, but it would make it unusable for EntityFramework, RIA Servies, and custom DALs. –  JasonRShaver May 31 '11 at 19:17
    
@JasonRShaver: No, IValidatableObject is defining a behavioral contract - that an object is "Validatable". This makes perfect sense as an interface. It's not an interface saying "this is a specific type of object" but rather "this object can do XXX". –  Reed Copsey May 31 '11 at 19:23
1  
The main distinction in my mind is that when the noun represents a data container (like this simplified Person), then an interface doesn't make sense. In other cases, where the class is primarily behavioral (such as a Person that has methods to do a wide variety of things that People do), IPerson may well make sense, as you can have classes that pretend to be a Person (via IPerson's defined behaviors), while not actually deriving from Person. The classic case in my mind is SomeService and ISomeService, where ISomeService is clearly the service contract for a particular service. –  Dan Bryant May 31 '11 at 19:30
    
@Dan: Yes, I agree - but, in your "IPerson as a behavior" case, I'd personally choose a better name for that contract ;) –  Reed Copsey May 31 '11 at 19:33
2  
I considered IPersonable, but the runtime would probably consider that an assertion violation. –  Dan Bryant May 31 '11 at 19:43
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Having both the IPerson interface and the Person base class allows you certain freedoms, as long as you are passing around objects under the IPerson interface rather than the Person base class.

Base classes tend to implement common code that should be used by all descendants of that base class. That's fine if that's what you want, but one might run into a case where an entirely different implementation of IPerson is needed, where the base class Person is not used at all. Now you have 2 class hierarchies that have IPerson in common, and things still work. You would not be able to do that with Person only.

Another good reason for the redundancy of always having an interface would be for COM interop.

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A situation where both the interface and the ABC makes sense is when using the decorator pattern. The ABC is used to provide common implementation code for the different concrete implementation classes. All implementation classes are probably derived from the ABC.

A decorator, which wraps an existing instance and tweaks the functionality of it would typically only implement the interface and not derive from the ABC. If there are many decorators, there could be another ABC which provides the common composition handling and function call forwarding that the decorators need.

Explicitly mentioning the interface sometimes makes it more readable. The MSDN documentation often do that, e.g. showing that List<> implements both ICollection<> and IList<> although IList<> is derived from ICollection<>.

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The only advantage I could think of with a derived class explicitly implementing the same interface as its base class is to prohibit the derived class from hiding a member and as a result breaking the interface.

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Interfaces specify a contract for behavior, so this only makes sense if you have sufficient behavior (beyond simple property accessors) that a non-Person might want to implement IPerson. For instance, if IPerson could HoldConversation(Stream input, Stream output), then you might have a TuringTestCandidate that implements IPerson, without actually deriving from Person.

In more practical terms, this pattern is typically used when you want to unit test behaviors of some class that depends on the interface and you don't want the overhead or possible interference from changes in the base class. It wouldn't make sense for this simplified example, but is often useful in practice.

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In this case, your interface and abstract class are quite redundant, except that the abstract class is fulfilling the method requirement of the interface. I don't see the need for the interface in this case, especially given that there is an abstract class.

If you were to be implementing methods on objects with two arms and two legs -> IThingWithArmsAndLegs::DoTheHokeyPokey() that could be a good use of an interface. Then this interface could be shared among Person : IThingWithArmsAndLegs, and Alien : IThingWithArmsAndLegs.

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Just for the sake of argument you could have common functionality in the abstract Person base class that not everything implementing the interface IPerson needs to reduce duplicate code. At the same time you could have some routines that expect an IPerson to perform some common logic.

Having said that, I wouldn't recommend this practice this at all.

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Interfaces tend to be used a lot in Dependency Injection scenarios because they are considered "light weight" dependencies. Using this approach you tend to have interfaces defining a lot of things, and often end up with abstract classes that implement the interface to provide the base implementation of some or all of the interface members.

I tend to think this is a little extreme, particularly in the example you provided where the abstract class does not provide anything beyond the properties. I have to say I've been guilty of this myself at times, generally using the excuse that the interface makes it more "testable", and is friendlier to my IoC container of choice. I've been trying to reduce the interface bloat in my code recently that comes from a general mentality that loose-coupling via interfaces are required for proper Dependency Injection, realizing that there is a point where things just become silly.

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I find I often need to use both with generic base classes. Usually at some point I need to pass a reference to the open class generic base class which unfortunately you can't do in C#, so I create a non-generic interface.

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None, if you extend the same interface twice, it's only used the first time. You can delete the 2nd IPerson and your code will still run fine.

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What second IPerson? I don't think you read it right. –  Joel B Fant May 31 '11 at 19:05
    
I meant his CoalMiner class that extends IPerson, even though his base class also extended it. –  Blindy May 31 '11 at 19:07
    
Ah, ok. It was the terminology. A class implements interfaces, an interface can extend another interface. –  Joel B Fant May 31 '11 at 19:12
    
Heh, it's all : to me :) –  Blindy May 31 '11 at 19:13
    
Actually, the C# spec (download.microsoft.com/download/0/B/D/…) uses "extend" in the context of inheritance only with reference to classes, not interfaces. Interfaces are said to "inherit from" other interfaces, while classes "support single inheritance and polymorphism, mechanisms whereby derived classes can extend and specialize base classes." You are correct in saying that a "class implements interfaces." –  phoog May 31 '11 at 20:17
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To me it looks bad specify Person and IPerson in the declaration of CoalMiner. I would just derive it from Person. The structur interface -> abstract class -> concrete class is fine with me, but overkill in most situations. I use it sometimes if most of the classes implementing the interface share a lot of code. So deriving from the abstract class is the default case for the 95% simple cases, but I would like to keep the option to have completly independent implementation of the interface.

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If you allow CoalMiner to inherit IPerson from its base class Pwerson, you will not be able to provide explicit implementation of members from IPerson. This could be an issue if you inherit other interfaces with conflicting members. –  phoog May 31 '11 at 20:02
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While there is no NEED for CoalMiner to have the IPerson interface, I know some people prefer that so it is obvious that the type implements the interface. That being said, I don't this it is very useful like that.

Interfaces to define nouns are very common in enterprise systems where you may need to support multiple data access layers (DAL) because your system deals with multiple other systems. In this case you might have the following abstract classes

public interface ICustomer {}

public abstract class SapEntity {}
public abstract class NHibernateEntity {}    

public class SapCustomer : SapEntity, ICustomer {}
public class NHibernateCustomer : NHibernateEntity, ICustomer {}

public class CustomerProcessor
{
   public ICustomer GetCustomer(int customerID)
   {
      // business logic here
   }
}
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