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I have a dedicated server (apache, php, mysql)

There is a primary domain (let's call it www.domain1.com) that actually holds all the files like any other regular web hosting account. Another domain (call it domain2.com) needs to forward to it, but with masking.

So domain2.com/filename.php, domain2.com/filename.php/432/r23-gjfdla-fdjslaf/ all need to show the corresponding content of domain1.com's content, BUT the browser should still show domain2.com instead of domain1.com, and it also has to be detectable by $_SERVER['HTTP_HOST'] so my server knows which domain was used to contact the website.

This is because I have 2 clients who are in a partnership, so they would like each visitor to retain whatever URL they entered for independent presentation but make the content unilateral without having to update two sites at once.

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<VirtualHost *:80> DocumentRoot /home/dangolub/public_html ServerName www.dangoluboff.ca ServerAlias www.charliecameron.com </VirtualHost> –  jeffkee Jun 18 '11 at 22:25
    
I added the above lines as per some instructions but it's not working. When charliecameron.com is typed, I just see the default hosting page of a blank account ("website ocming soon!") –  jeffkee Jun 18 '11 at 22:26
1  
When you modified the Apache config and added the server alias, did you restart the Apache process (it needs to be)? –  Francois Deschenes Jun 23 '11 at 6:50

6 Answers 6

up vote 27 down vote accepted
<VirtualHost *:80>
  DocumentRoot /www/example1
  ServerName www.domain1.com
  ServerAlias www.domain2.com
</VirtualHost>
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4  
Just to expand, with this setup, $_SERVER['SERVER_NAME'] will show domain1, but $_SERVER['HTTP_HOST'] will show domain2. –  Marc B May 31 '11 at 20:30
    
Can you explain what the DocumentRoot feature does? This has to apply to the entire domain and all of it's URLs. Also part of it is a Wordpress set up... –  jeffkee Jun 11 '11 at 13:17
    
I need a bit more help. So does this go into the htaccess file on domain1.com's end? And domain2.com should be stealth (or masked) forwarded to domain1.com? –  jeffkee Jun 16 '11 at 22:16
    
This goes to the Apache Virtual Hosts section. Both domain1 and domain2 are regular domains. –  akond Jun 17 '11 at 6:28
1  
What is the error? –  akond Jun 19 '11 at 7:33

What you need is Virtual Host feature - two virtual hosts pointing to one location.

Of course code of the page should be flexible enough to support that - for example internal URLs, if absolute (with http:// or https:// part), should also reflect the changes. But you probably already know it.

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Yup I got no issues on the internal code to detect the domain, http vs https etc. Now another question - I have both domains working with Google Apps. If I set custom MX handlers, this will still not affect each other, I hope? –  jeffkee Jun 2 '11 at 14:10
    
@jeffkee The MX records do not influence the records responsible for directing users to the proper server (A and CNAME records, as far as I remember). MX records are responsible for directing emails sent to your domain to the proper server. –  Tadeck Jun 22 '11 at 14:54

I have done something very similar for a couple of small sites run by the same company (one company, two properties, each with their own site). Both are on shared hosting, but you should be able to do exactly the same with VirtualHosts - just define two VirtualHosts, each with a separate domain name, but each pointing to exactly the same document root on the file system:

<VirtualHost *:80>
    ServerName site1.com
    DocumentRoot /srv/www/public_html
</VirtualHost>

<VirtualHost *:80>
    ServerName site2.com
    DocumentRoot /srv/www/public_html
</VirtualHost>

I have index.php in the public_html directory. This checks $_SERVER['HTTP_HOST'] to determine the domain name that is in use. It then sets a few constants with appropriate directory locations, and a site flag which is used when accessing the database.

I have three directories for static content. One is shared content that is used for both domains, and the other two are site-specific, which include things like logos.

The rest of the PHP scripts are held outside of the document root in a separate scripts directory. Where necessary, the scripts can use the constants defined in index.php, for things such as absolute URLs, or other site-specific information.

/srv/www/
|
|--public_html
|  |
|  |--site1
|  |  |
|  |  |--css
|  |  |--images
|  |
|  |--site2
|  |  |
|  |  |--css
|  |  |--images
|  |
|  |--shared
|     |
|     |--css
|     |--images
|
|--scripts

If you wanted two separate document roots, just create two separate index.php files, one for each. They can then both call the same common codebase (under /srv/www/scripts/, in my case). Something like this:

/srv/www/
|
|--site1
|  |
|  |--public_html
|     |
|     |--css
|     |--images
|   
|--site2
|  |
|  |--public_html
|     |
|     |--css
|     |--images
|
|--scripts

And then:

<VirtualHost *:80>
    ServerName site1.com
    DocumentRoot /srv/www/site1/public_html
</VirtualHost>

<VirtualHost *:80>
    ServerName site2.com
    DocumentRoot /srv/www/site2/public_html
</VirtualHost>
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Just edit the DNS on domain2.com to point to the same nameserver records for domain1.com. As long as the files used on your site are not hard-coded to a specific domain, it will automatically use masking.

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When you say "regular web hosting account", I'm assuming a shared hosting. If so, instead of using the Virtual host feature, for which you may not even have access, you must try the .htaccess method:

There's already a question on this: .htaccess redirect one domain to another incliuding specific query string

Hope it helped. :-)

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That is about doing a redirect, so the browser picks actively content from the other domain which is not what the OP wanted if I read the question right. –  hakre Jun 23 '11 at 21:09
    
@harke The OP wants to "forward" all requests for one domain to another domain and he mentions he needs "masking". So, I believe .htaccess would be simpler. –  Sterex Jun 27 '11 at 11:39

If you apache server has mod_proxy available, you can use it to pass requests onto other domains by the server - not the client.

You can then make use of it within mod_rewrite RewriteRules by using the P flag.

The benefit is that you can control this per .htaccess:

RewriteRule (.*)\.(jpg|gif|png) http://images.example.com$1.$2 [P]

Simple P / proxy flag example.

You could place a .htaccess inside the document root of domain2 and then proxy all requests over to domain1:

RwriteRule ^(.*)$ http://domain1$1 [P]
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