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I'm scanning through all characters in a textbox. Then the program counts how many of each character is in the textbox. Here's the code which adds all characters to a list:

For each c as char in TxtBox
    list.add(c)
Next

Everything's working fine, except this will also add returns to the list, which I don't want. I thought I could write like this:

If c <> chr(10) Then
    list.add(c)
End If

...but it's not working. Any ideas?

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2  
You would also need to exclude chr(13). 10 = new line, 13 = carriage return. –  Fosco May 31 '11 at 19:29
    
Maybe the Char.IsLetter(Char) method helps if you just want to count letters you can do var countedChars = TxtBox.Where(c => Char.IsLetter(c)).GroupBy(x => x);` which sould return a list of groupings with a char as key. –  Zebi May 31 '11 at 19:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You would also need to exclude chr(13). 10 = new line, 13 = carriage return.

For each c as char in TxtBox

   if c <> chr(10) and c <> chr(13) then
      list.add(c)
   end if

Give that a shot.

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In Windows, both LF = LineFeed = Chr(10) and CR = Carriage Return = Chr(13) are inserted as return character.

This comes from (old) dot-matrix printers.

LineFeed = Move one line down
Carriage Return = Move to the begin of the current line

They are both included in the Environment.NewLine property.

So your code should be something like:

 If Environment.NewLine.IndexOf(c) < 0 Then
    list.Add(c)
 End If

This way your are sure your code also works on OS'es that use different characters for newline.

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Well, there are already lots of answers, but the way I would have done it is as follows:

For Each c As Char In TextBox1.Text.Replace(vbCrLf, "")
    List.Add(c)
Next

I don't know what your "List" variable is, but if it's of a List type, or of type ListBox.ObjectCollection, or of many other types, you could probably replace this loop with:

List.AddRange(TextBox1.Text.Replace(vbCrLf, "").ToCharArray())

...just for the fun of it!

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