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Assuming this table with nearly 5 000 000 rows

CREATE TABLE `author2book` (
  `author_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
  `book_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
  KEY `author_id_INDEX` (`author_id`),
  KEY `paper_id_INDEX` (`book_id`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 COLLATE=utf8_unicode_ci

is it possible to add a primary index column id with autoincrement as first place? I expect something like this:

CREATE TABLE `author2book` (
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,  <<<<  This is what I try to achieve!
  `author_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
  `book_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
  KEY `author_id_INDEX` (`author_id`),
  KEY `paper_id_INDEX` (`book_id`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 COLLATE=utf8_unicode_ci

Is this possible?

Edit: I should mention, that I'd like the added column to be populated.

share|improve this question
    
FYI, you've left the column definition for paper_id out of your CREATE TABLE statement ... you need to put paper_id int(11) NOT NULL, or somesuch in the example statements. –  joelhardi May 31 '11 at 20:04
    
@joelhardi: This was just a type error. I corrected that. Thanks! –  Aufwind May 31 '11 at 20:08
    
Cool, I figured it was just a copy-and-paste error, just thought it would be good if the example code worked for anybody else reading the question. –  joelhardi May 31 '11 at 20:15
    
@joelhardi, you got a point there. Thanks for pointing that out. I am sure, folks would be thankful, if the question and the answer are both constistent. –  Aufwind May 31 '11 at 20:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can use ALTER TABLE to add the column and index in one command. i.e.:

ALTER TABLE author2book ADD id INT(11) UNSIGNED NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT, ADD PRIMARY KEY (id);

See the MySQL docs for ALTER TABLE for more info.

share|improve this answer
    
Will the added index be populated or do I have to do that manually? –  Aufwind May 31 '11 at 20:01
    
+1 Even better. –  Fosco May 31 '11 at 20:01
1  
@Aufwind, it will be populated, but I suggest you get some coffee, it might take a while. –  Johan May 31 '11 at 20:07
2  
Aufwind, yes, this will create the index (primary key is always an index). You can do SHOW INDEXES FROM author2book; to see. Definitely a good idea to run on a copy of the table first to see how long your 5000000 records will take. –  joelhardi May 31 '11 at 20:08
    
@Johan: Query OK, 4355000 rows affected (1 min 20.57 sec) Records: 4355000 Duplicates: 0 Warnings: 0 That was a fast coffee... ;-) But thanks for the warning, though. I expected it too, to take much longer. –  Aufwind May 31 '11 at 20:16

Create a new table with the structure you want and the auto-incrementing key, and then insert all of the records from this table into that new table... then drop (or rename) the original table, and rename the new table to the original name.

insert into newTable (author_id, book_id) 
select * from author2book

newTable will then contain your desired output.

share|improve this answer
    
Would love to know the reason for the downvote! –  Fosco May 31 '11 at 19:50
1  
Didn't downvote, but there's no need for a separate table, just an alter table that changes the field into autoincrement will do, and besides, alter table does the following 1. creates an empty table with the new structure 2. copies the rows over 3. deletes the old table 4. renames the new table to have the same name as the old table. –  Johan May 31 '11 at 20:09
ALTER TABLE author2book
ADD COLUMN `id` int(11) NOT NULL FIRST;

Populate the id field manually (by a script maybe?), then:

ALTER TABLE author2book
MODIFY COLUMN `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY;
share|improve this answer
    
"by a script maybe?" I think this is the crux of the OP's question. –  Fosco May 31 '11 at 20:00
    
@Fosco, you got me right. I edited my question to point this out. –  Aufwind May 31 '11 at 20:04

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