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I have a bunch of local variable references in a Python script that I want to pull from a dictionary instead. So, I need to essentially change foo, bar, and others into env['foo'], env['bar'] and so on. Do I need to write a regular expression and match each variable name to transform, or is there a more direct approach that I could just repeat with the . command?

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Great question; I use the "surround.vim" (search on google) for spaces, but surrounding by parenthesis/brackets and prepending a function name or dictionary name would be fantastic. I respectfully suggest you wait to see if a better answer than the current 3 surfaces... –  gatoatigrado May 31 '11 at 20:38
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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can use a macro: type these commands in one go (with spacing just to insert comments)

             " first move to start of the relevant word (ie via search)
qa           " record macro into the a register.
ienv['<esc>  " insert relevant piece
ea']         " move to end of word and insert relevant piece
q            " stop recording

then, when you're on the next word, just hit @a to replay the macro (or even @@ to repeat the last replay after that).

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That's a character or two shorter than what I had. Thanks! I've been neglecting recorded macros, and I should start using them more often. –  Judge Maygarden May 31 '11 at 20:47
1  
Depending on how your words are organized, you can place the cursor at the start of the next word before stopping recording. Then just repeat the recorded macro n-1 times (as the first word you have already changed to record the macro) –  freitass Jun 1 '11 at 3:25
    
I have :vmap @ :normal! @ mapped in my vimrc so that I can execute a macro on a visually selected range of lines as well as n times. This works by visually selecting, hitting @, typing the letter of the macro and then finally hitting enter. –  Greg Sexton Jun 2 '11 at 8:02
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There's an easier way - you can use a regex search and replace. Go into cmdline mode by typing a colon and then run this command:

%s/\\(foo\|bar\|baz\\)/env['\1']/

Replacing foo, bar, and baz with whatever your actual variable names are. You can add as many additional variables as you'd like, just be sure to escape your OR pipes with a backslash. Hope that helps.

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you could write a function that would do this pretty well, add this to your .vimrc file:

function! s:surround()
    let word = expand("<cword>")
    let command = "%s/".word."/env[\'".word."\']/g"
    execute command
endfunction
map cx :call <SID>surround()<CR>

This will surround every occurance of the word currently under the cursor.

If you wanted to specify what went before and after each instance you could use this:

function! s:surround()
    let word = expand("<cword>")
    let before = input("what should go before? ")
    let after = input("what should go after? ")
    let command = "%s/".word."/".before.word.after."/g"
    execute command
endfunction
map cx :call <SID>surround()<CR>

If you only want to confirm each instance of the variable you could use this:

function! s:surround()
    let word = expand("<cword>")
    let before = input("what should go before? ")
    let after = input("what should go after? ")
    let command = "%s/".word."/".before.word.after."/c"
    execute command
endfunction
map cx :call <SID>surround()<CR>
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Can that be parameterized with a prefix and postfix for more general use? –  Judge Maygarden Jun 1 '11 at 3:38
    
Also, that operates on the entire line. How about just the word under the cursor? –  Judge Maygarden Jun 1 '11 at 3:42
    
I'm sure it could be parameterized but to be honest I am not very familiar with vim functions and so I don't know how it would be done. you could get user input with let before = input("What text should go before ".word."? ") this would take more time per replace but would be more flexible. I'll edit the answer with a version that includes this. –  Sam Brinck Jun 1 '11 at 14:52
    
In my testing this replaces every instance of the current word in the file. Are you wanting it to only act on one word at a time? I'll update the answer with an option that would do that. –  Sam Brinck Jun 1 '11 at 14:55
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I figured out one way to do what I need. Use q{0-9a-zA-Z"} to record key strokes into a buffer. Position the cursor at the begging of the variable name, then cw and type env['']. Next move the cursor back one space to the last quote and paste the buffer filled from the cw command with P. Finally, reuse the recording with @{0-9a-z".=*} for each variable.

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Press @ twice to repeat last macro –  johnny Jun 1 '11 at 6:30
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