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Either I'm too stupid to use google, or nobody else encountered this problem so far.

I'm trying to compile the following code:

public interface MyClass {
  public class Util {
    private static MyClass _this;
    public static <T extends MyClass> T getInstance(Class<T> clazz) {
      if(_this == null) {
        try {
          _this = clazz.newInstance();
        } catch(Exception e) {
          e.printStackTrace();
        }
      }
      return _this;
    }
  }
}

Howerer, in the line "return _this;" I get the error "Type mismatch: cannot convert from MyClass to T" Why is this? T extends MyClass, so where is the problem? If I change the line to "return (T)_this;", i just get a warning about the unchecked cast, but I don't like warnings ;-) Is there a way to achieve what i want without an error or warning?

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3  
What are you really trying to accomplish here? –  MatrixFrog May 31 '11 at 20:09
3  
naming a static var _this sounds like asking for trouble –  matt b May 31 '11 at 20:46
    
@MatrixFrog - sigh i wanted a factory in the interface so i dont have to write one for every implementing subclass. you can laugh now ;-) –  MarioP May 31 '11 at 20:57
    
@matt b: Naming an interface MyClass is also asking for trouble! –  Asaph Jun 1 '11 at 3:11

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Imagine you have two implementations of MyClass, Foo and Bar. As a field of type MyClass, _this could be a Foo or a Bar.

Now, since your getInstance method returns <T extends MyClass>, it's legal to call it any of these ways:

MyClass myClass = Util.getInstance(MyClass.class);

This doesn't work if it's the first call, because MyClass is an interface and can't be instantiated with newInstance().

Foo foo = Util.getInstance(Foo.class);
Bar bar = Util.getInstance(Bar.class);

Now, what would happen if _this was an instance of Foo and you called Util.getInstance(Bar.class)? That's why you aren't allowed to do this.

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1  
wow, looks like i made a huge error in reasoning there. considering this, it wouldnt have worked the way i want anyway. thanks for the explanation. –  MarioP May 31 '11 at 20:34
    
+1: Good explanation. I have one nitpick; You say "Imagine you have two subclasses of MyClass". Since MyClass is actually an interface, not a class, can you change the word "subclasses" to "implementations"? And then in the next sentence, you go on to say that "_this could be a MyClass, a Foo or a Bar. But in fact, it's always a MyClass. In addition to being a MyClass, _this could be a Foo or a Bar. –  Asaph Jun 1 '11 at 0:02
1  
@Asaph: Good point. My explanation treated MyClass as if it were a concrete class. It being an interface also raises another issue which I've edited my answer to mention. –  ColinD Jun 1 '11 at 1:36
    
In your defense, the interface was called MyClass. –  Asaph Jun 1 '11 at 3:14

That's because the variable _this is of type MyClass, not type T. Even though it happens to contain an instance of T, the compiler doesn't have a way of knowing that.

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I just verified that this makes the compiler happy and still constrains types in the manner that you want:

public interface MyClass {
  public class Util {
    private static MyClass _this;
      public static MyClass getInstance(Class<? extends MyClass> clazz) {
        if(_this == null) {
          try {
            _this = clazz.newInstance();
          } catch(Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
          }
        }
        return _this;
    }
  }
}

Edit:

Thinking about the client code, this actually just exposes a bug in the design of this factory. Imagine this:

MyClass foo = MyClass.getInstance(Foo.class); // sets _this to a Foo and returns it

MyClass bar = MyClass.getInstance(Bar.class); // _this is already set to a Foo and
                                              // we return a Foo when we probably
                                              // are expecting a Bar!
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But then the method explicitly returns an instance of a MyClass and the client would have to do the cast on the outside instead, right? –  aioobe May 31 '11 at 20:19
    
@aioobe: There'd be a ClassCastException waiting to happen if they did cast. –  ColinD May 31 '11 at 20:20
    
My assumption is that the client code assigns the return value to something with type MyClass. –  Asaph May 31 '11 at 20:24
    
I don't get it. If you say getInstance returns a MyClass then you'd have to cast the result to the desired type on the outside. Why wouldn't you want to say that it returns a T and do the cast on the inside? –  aioobe May 31 '11 at 20:34
1  
you are right, i made a huge design flaw there. –  MarioP May 31 '11 at 20:44

The "Type Mismatch"...

...is due to the following:

  • T represents a subclass of MyClass.
  • getInstance is declared to return an object of type T
  • It returns an object of type MyClass.

It's like declaring a method to return a Double while it returns some Number.

The solution...

... is to change the return statement to

return (T) _this;

(and add @SuppressWarnings("unchecked") if you want to get rid of the warning).

But there's a problem...

As ColinD points out: Suppose you have

class MyClassImpl1 implements MyClass {
}

class MyClassImpl2 implements MyClass {
}

and do the following:

MyClassImpl1 o1 = MyClass.Util.getInstance(MyClassImpl1.class);
// _this now holds a value of type MyClassImpl1...

// ... which causes this line to throw a ClassCastException.
MyClassImpl2 o2 = MyClass.Util.getInstance(MyClassImpl2.class);
share|improve this answer
    
I don't think this is a good idea; the method signature lies about what it can do. –  ColinD May 31 '11 at 20:22
    
Hmm.. could you explain what you mean by that? (Forgive me if I'm being slow here.) –  aioobe May 31 '11 at 20:24
    
Sorry. I just read your answer for like the third time and I see what you mean... I'll update my answer. –  aioobe May 31 '11 at 20:26

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