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I am attempting to implement collision response in a simulation that I am creating. Basically, the program simulates a ball being thrown off a 50 meter building with some initial velocity.

I don't believe that the program is outputting realistic values for time of collision as well as values for x, y and vx, vy.

Here is the program:

 #include<stdio.h>
 #include<math.h>
 #include<stdlib.h>

 int main() {

     FILE *fp; 
     FILE *fr;

     //Declare and initialize all variables to be used
     float ax = 0, ay = 0, x = 0, y = 0, vx = 0, vy = 0; 
     float time = 0, deltaTime = .001; 
     float vyImpact = 0, vxImpact = 0, xImpact = 0; 

     float old_y = 0,  old_x = 0, old_vy = 0, old_vx = 0;
     float deltaTime2 = 0,  deltaTime3 = 0;

     int numBounces = 0;

     //Coefficient of Restitution; epsilon = ex = ey
     float ex = .5;
     float ey = .5;

     fr = fopen("input_data.txt", "rt"); //Open file for reading

     fp = fopen( "output_data.txt", "w" ); // Open file for writing

     if(fr == NULL){ printf("File not found");} //if text file is not in directory...

     if(fp == NULL){ printf("File not found");} //if text file is not in directory...

     fscanf(fr, "ax: %f ay: %f x: %f y: %f vx: %f vy: %f\n", &ax, &ay, &x, &y, &vx, &vy); 

     while (numBounces < 9) {

          //time = time + deltaTime
          time = time + deltaTime;

          //velocity[new] = velocity[old] + acc * deltaTime
          vx = vx + ax*deltaTime;
          vy = vy + ay*deltaTime;

          //position[new] = position[old] + velocity*deltaTime + .5*acc*(deltaTime)^2
          x = x + vx*deltaTime + (.5*ax*deltaTime*deltaTime);
          y = y + vy*deltaTime + (.5*ay*deltaTime*deltaTime);  

          fprintf(fp, "%f\t%f\t%f\t%f\t%f\t%f\t%f\t\n", ax, ay, x, y, vx, vy, time);

               //Collision occurs; implement collision response
              if (y < 0) {

                   //"Undo" values for y, x, and velocity
                   old_y = y - vy*deltaTime - (.5*ay*deltaTime*deltaTime); 
                   old_x = x - vx*deltaTime - (.5*ax*deltaTime*deltaTime); 
                   old_vy = vy - ay*deltaTime;
                   old_vx = vx - ax*deltaTime; 

                   //Calculate time of collision
                   deltaTime2 = (-old_y + sqrt((old_y*old_y) - 2*ay*old_y)) / (ay);
                   printf("Time of Collision = %f\n", time - deltaTime2); 

                   //Calculate velocity and x position at collsion
                   vyImpact = old_vy + ay*deltaTime2;
                   vxImpact = old_vx + ax*deltaTime2;
                   xImpact = old_x + old_vx*deltaTime2 + .5*ax*(deltaTime2*deltaTime2);

                   //Calculate new time for when ball bounces
                   deltaTime3 = deltaTime - deltaTime2;

                   //Calculate new x and y position and velocity for when ball bounces
                   x = xImpact + (ex)*vxImpact*deltaTime3 + .5*ax*(deltaTime3*deltaTime3);
                   y = 0 + (-ey)*vyImpact*deltaTime3 + .5*ay*(deltaTime3*deltaTime3);
                   vy = (-ey)*vyImpact + ay*deltaTime3;
                   vx = (ex)*vxImpact + ax*deltaTime3; 

                   numBounces++; 
                   printf("Number of Bounce(s) = %d\n", numBounces);


                   fprintf(fp, "%f\t%f\t%f\t%f\t%f\t%f\t%f\t\n", ax, ay, x, y, vx, vy, time);

               }
     }

     fclose(fp); //Close output file
     fclose(fr); //Close input file

     //system ("PAUSE"); 
     return 0;
  }

Basically, I am trying to produce accurate values so that I can see a plot of what this simulation is supposed to look like. I am assuming the logical errors have something to do with the physics. But being that my physics knowledge is limited, I am not able to see what exactly is wrong.

Here is sample input: ax: 0 ay: -9.8 x: 0 y: 50 vx: 8.66 vy: 5

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1  
First: don't use float! In the absence of a strong reason to do otherwise, all floating point variables in your program should be double (or double _Complex if you need that). –  pmg May 31 '11 at 20:22
    
"I don't believe that the program is outputting realistic values": So what is it outputting? What do you feed it? What do you expect? –  Bart May 31 '11 at 20:37
    
Here is some sample data: ax: 0 ay: -9.8 x: 0 y: 50 vx: 8.66 vy: 5 But I am really just trying to view a plot of the simulation, and I can't even get that. So really I just want "sketchable" data. –  kachilous May 31 '11 at 20:41

1 Answer 1

It seems to me that your problem may lie in how you're implementing the kinematics equations.

//velocity[new] = velocity[old] + acc * deltaTime
vx = vx + ax*deltaTime;
vy = vy + ay*deltaTime;

//position[new] = position[old] + velocity*deltaTime + .5*acc*(deltaTime)^2
x = x + vx*deltaTime + (.5*ax*deltaTime*deltaTime);
y = y + vy*deltaTime + (.5*ay*deltaTime*deltaTime);

Two things here: you're already taking the acceleration into account in your equations for vx and vy, and you're using summation rather than integrated equations. The .5*ax*deltaTime*deltaTime and .5*ay*deltaTime*deltaTime shouldn't be included. The equation x= 0.5*a*t^2 is used when calculating the distance traveled due to a constant acceleration for the total amount of time, based on the integral of the velocity equation. As you're doing summation and already include the acceleration in your velocity equations, there's no need to include the acceleration in the position equations.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok so I should remove the equations for x,y,old_x and old_y? And how will I get the distance traveled, if I remove those equations? –  kachilous May 31 '11 at 20:54
    
You shouldn't remove them completely, just remove the + (.5*a_*deltaTime*deltaTime) bits from your equations for x and y and see if the results are better. –  JAB May 31 '11 at 21:00
    
I'm still not getting a plot. Would 0.056073 be a realistic initial time of collision? –  kachilous May 31 '11 at 21:03
    
+1 translation integration should indeed be p = p + dt.v I would add that contact is much easier with a spring/damper than what you are trying. –  David Heffernan May 31 '11 at 22:48
1  
model the contact as an elastic spring using hooke's law. Add a damping term, i.e. term prop. to velocity if you want to extract energy during contact –  David Heffernan Jun 1 '11 at 19:32

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