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On my web page, the background is a big image, and the top banner has some elements that overflow to the background. The banner and the background should meet seamlessly.

No matter what I do, there is 1 pixel separating the banner from the rest of the image on the background.

The CSS

/* body layout */
body {
    background: url(../images/background-home.jpg) no-repeat top center; 
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
    color: #404e54;
}

/* top banner */
#banner{
    width:980px;
    height:423px;
    background-image:url(../images/top-banner.jpg);
    background-position:top left; /* I tryed changing this - the image is 980px*/
}

/* main container */
.container {
    width:980px; 
    margin:0 auto;
}

The basic page layout:

...
</head>
<body>
<div class="container">
<div id="#banner"></div>
...
</div>
</body>
...

I will try to load a picture to show the problem and if still not good enough, will try to load an example somewhere.

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closed as not a real question by Fosco, Gilles, kapa, Mitch Dempsey, bmargulies May 31 '11 at 21:43

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
I think demo is needed to examine the problem –  Billy Moon May 31 '11 at 20:26
    
Please post some HTML code + CSS, so we can see how you put your page together. –  BryanH May 31 '11 at 20:27
    
he didn't want any floating div, etc. I can always find things that amaze me... Let the sitebuilder decide which technique to use. This is certainly not the way a website should be built nowadays. –  kapa May 31 '11 at 20:30
    
@bazmegkapa : This. Whenever a client starts getting into the weeds to this level, I tell them that I'd be happy to do (whatever crazy thing they suggest), but it will cost $__ more. If the requirements are crazy to start with, then I pass everytime. –  BryanH May 31 '11 at 20:34
    
Agreed - but I cannot afford to loose the project :) Sometimes I even get projects that the designer says: only table please... no "fancy" css + div –  Ronaldo Santana May 31 '11 at 20:35

2 Answers 2

The algorithm used to calculate the position of an element centred using margin: 0 auto; may be different from the algorithm used to calculate the position of an image in a top center background; typically the problem is half-pixel rounding working differently when the remainder-width is not an even number of pixels.

Typically this affects IE worst. If you try to ‘fix’ it simply by including a 1px jog you will probably end up with it being misaligned in some other window sizes and browsers.

A potential fix, depending on how the banner layout works, would be to make it a 100%-width div with a top center background image, ie duplicating the body background horizontally, so that the same rounding always applies. Otherwise, well, building 1px of positioning leeway into your images might be possible... typically easier if you're dealing with transparent PNGs though.

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Hum, might be the case. The thing is that in this problem, I tested with FF, Chrome, IE (8 and 9). –  Ronaldo Santana Jun 1 '11 at 20:52

At a guess I'd say the background image itself is the one which is 1px out (or off centre) - though you should check this on different resolutions and zoom level to see if the pixel actually comes into alignment at different screen sizes - it could just be a rounding difference between "centre" of the background image position and centering of the 980px wide "container" div.

To get the banner over it, if it's a constant 1px difference at different screen sizes add position: relative to the container and then either left: 1px or left: -1px; depending on which way your pixel is out.

that will in effect put the whole container 1px off centre but it is unlikely to be noticeable, well not nearly as much as the image misalignment ;)

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