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It is possible to create a primary key or unique index within a SQL Server CREATE TABLE statement. Is it possible to create a non-unique index within a CREATE TABLE statement?

CREATE TABLE MyTable(
    a int NOT NULL
    ,b smallint NOT NULL
    ,c smallint NOT NULL
    ,d smallint NOT NULL
    ,e smallint NOT NULL

    -- This creates a primary key
    ,CONSTRAINT PK_MyTable PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED (a)

    -- This creates a unique nonclustered index on columns b and c
    ,CONSTRAINT IX_MyTable1 UNIQUE (b, c)

    -- Is it possible to create a non-unique index on columns d and e here?
    -- Note: these variations would not work if attempted:
    -- ,CONSTRAINT IX_MyTable2 INDEX (d, e)
    -- ,CONSTRAINT IX_MyTable3 NONCLUSTERED INDEX (d, e)
);
GO

-- The proposed non-unique index should behave identically to
-- an index created after the CREATE TABLE statement. Example:
CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX IX_MyTable4 ON MY_TABLE (d, e);
GO

Again, the goal is to create the non-unique index within the CREATE TABLE statement, not after it.

For what it's worth, I did not find the [SQL Server Books Online entry for CREATE TABLE] to be helpful.

Also, [This Question] is nearly identical, but the accepted answer does not apply.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 14 down vote accepted

You cannot. CREATE/ALTER TABLE only accept CONSTRAINTs to be added, not indexes. The fact that primary key and unique constraints are implemented in terms of an index is a side effect. To manage indexes, you have CREATE/ALTER/DROP INDEX, as you are well aware.

Why do you have a such a requirement as to ad non-unique-non-clustered indexes in the CREATE TABLE statement?

Note that SQL Server 2014 introduced the inline index create option:

CREATE TABLE MyTable(
    a int NOT NULL
    ,b smallint NOT NULL
    ,c smallint NOT NULL
    ,d smallint NOT NULL
    ,e smallint NOT NULL

    -- This creates a primary key
    ,CONSTRAINT PK_MyTable PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED (a)

    -- This creates a unique nonclustered index on columns b and c
    ,CONSTRAINT IX_MyTable1 UNIQUE (b, c)

    -- This creates a non-clustered index on (d, e)
    ,INDEX NONCLUSTERED IX_MyTable4 ON MY_TABLE (d, e)
);
GO
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6  
Thanks for the great explanation! Why? Purely for aesthetic reasons. I thought it could be convenient to anyone reading the script if all constraints/indexes are contained within the same statement. Personally, I like to know whether columns belonging to a foreign key also have an index, and this may have been a nice method to logically group this information in the same statement. –  Mike May 31 '11 at 21:12
    
@RemusRusanu: Sory, I'm not careful. I removed comment. –  23W Nov 24 at 8:47

It's a separate statement.

It's also not possible to insert into a table and select from it and build an index in the same statement either.

The BOL entry contains the information you need:

CLUSTERED | NONCLUSTERED
Indicate that a clustered or a nonclustered index is created for the PRIMARY KEY or UNIQUE constraint. PRIMARY KEY constraints default to CLUSTERED, and UNIQUE constraints default to NONCLUSTERED.

In a CREATE TABLE statement, CLUSTERED can be specified for only one constraint. If CLUSTERED is specified for a UNIQUE constraint and a PRIMARY KEY constraint is also specified, the PRIMARY KEY defaults to NONCLUSTERED.

You can create an index on a PK field, but not a non-clustered index on a non-pk non-unique-constrained field.

A NCL index is not relevant to the structure of the table, and is not a constraint on the data inside the table. It's a separate entity that supports the table but is not integral to it's functionality or design.

That's why it's a separate statement. The NCL index is irrelevant to the table from a design perspective (query optimization notwithstanding).

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Thanks for answering! The indexing bit of the BOL entry was not explicit enough for me to catch that indexes within the CREATE TABLE statement applied only to "PRIMARY KEY or UNIQUE constraint[s]", so thank you for straightening that out! –  Mike May 31 '11 at 21:21

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