Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been successfully using Python properties, but I don't see how they could work. If I dereference a property outside of a class, I just get an object of type property:

>>> @property
... def hello(): return "Hello, world!"
...
>>> hello
<property object at 0x9870a8>

But if I put a property in a class, the behavior is very different:

>>> class Foo(object):
...   @property
...   def hello(self): return "Hello, world!"
...
>>> Foo().hello
'Hello, world!'

I've noticed that unbound Foo.hello is still the property object, so class instantiation must be doing the magic, but what magic is that?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 26 down vote accepted

As others have noted, they use a language feature called descriptors.

The reason that the actual property object is returned when you access it via a class Hello.foo lies in how the property implements the __get__(self, instance, owner) special method. If a descriptor is accessed on an instance, then that instance is passed as the appropriate argument, and owner is the class of that instance.

On the other hand, if it is accessed through the class, then instance is None and only owner is passed. The property object recognizes this and returns self.


Besides the Descriptors howto, see also the documentation on Implementing Descriptors and Invoking Descriptors in the Language Guide.

share|improve this answer

The property object just implements the descriptor protocol: http://docs.python.org/howto/descriptor.html

share|improve this answer
    
wondering about the downvote?! –  Achim May 31 '11 at 21:12
5  
I stopped wondering about downvotes. You'll get them in completely random patterns, and only about 5 percent come with an explanation. –  Sven Marnach May 31 '11 at 21:16
    
Me too. +1, though Ignacio was first. –  larsmans May 31 '11 at 21:16
7  
I certainly understand the reasoning behind a dw in this case, both this answer and the one accepted are devoid of a real explanation, and are just basically links. While this is sufficient in some error-solving cases, it seems the OP was looking for a human explanation on the subject. –  Morgan Wilde May 28 '13 at 0:07

Properties are descriptors, and descriptors behave specially when member of a class instance. In short, if a is an instance of type A, and A.foo is a descriptor, then a.foo is equivalent to A.foo.__get__(a).

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, they also seems to work with an old-style class (in Python 2.7). But thanks for the link, will read. –  larsmans May 31 '11 at 21:14
    
Note that the method signature for __get__() is incorrect. It has two arguments (in addition to self). Otherwise well explained. –  Tim Yates May 31 '11 at 21:18
    
@larsmans: From the linked page: "Note that descriptors are only invoked for new style objects or classes." I also remember that I once tried them for old style classes. –  Sven Marnach May 31 '11 at 21:19
    
@Tim: The second argument is optional. –  Sven Marnach May 31 '11 at 21:20
2  
@larsmans: I did some quick tests. The type of the descriptor itself must be a new-style class, otherwise it won't work. The class containing the descriptor does not matter. The above quotation could be read in either way. –  Sven Marnach May 31 '11 at 21:31

In order for @properties to work properly the class needs to be a subclass of object. when the class is not a subclass of object then the first time you try access the setter it actually makes a new attribute with the shorter name instead of accessing through the setter.

The following does not work correctly.

class C(): # <-- Notice that object is missing

    def __init__(self):
        self._x = None

    @property
    def x(self):
        print 'getting value of x'
        return self._x

    @x.setter
    def x(self, x):
        print 'setting value of x'
        self._x = x

>>> c = C()
>>> c.x = 1
>>> print c.x, c._x
1 0

The following will work correctly

class C(object):

    def __init__(self):
        self._x = None

    @property
    def x(self):
        print 'getting value of x'
        return self._x

    @x.setter
    def x(self, x):
        print 'setting value of x'
        self._x = x

>>> c = C()
>>> c.x = 1
setting value of x
>>> print c.x, c._x
getting value of x
1 1
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.