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I had some code thrown at me to 'productionize.' I ran a memory leak checker and it calls out the following line within the 'for' loop below as a memory leak.

someStruct->arrayMap = new std::list<BasisIndex>*[someStruct->mapSizeX];
for(int i=0; i<someStruct->mapSizeX; i++){  
    someStruct->arrayMap[i] = new std::list<BasisIndex>[someStruct->mapSizeY];
}

Here is how the array map is declared:

struct SomeStruct{
    int mapSizeX;
    int mapSizeY;
    std::list<BasisIndex>** arrayMap;
};

Here are a couple usages of it:

someStruct->arrayMap[xVal][yVal].push_back(tempIndex);

for(it = someStruct->arrayMap[xVal][yVal].begin(); it != someStruct->arrayMap[xVal][yVal].end(); it++){
    ...
}

The memory leak checker dumped for 5 minutes before I killed it. Then I added the following bit of code in a cleanup routine but it still dumps out 150 warnings all pointing to the line of code within the for loop at the top.

for(int x=0; x<someStruct->mapSizeX; x++){
    for(int y=0; y<someStruct->mapSizeY; y++){
        someStruct->arrayMap[x][y].clear();
        someStruct->arrayMap[x][y].~list();
    }
}

std::list<BasisIndex> ** temp = someStruct->arrayMap;
delete temp;

How do I completely delete the memory associated with this array map?

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3  
Use a std::vector<std::vector<std::list<T> > > instead. Allocating STL containers with new is horrible. (And by horrible I mean killing puppies horrible) –  Billy ONeal May 31 '11 at 22:59
    
@Billy: Actually it's much worse. It's killing kittens! –  sbi May 31 '11 at 23:12
    
I don't have much experience with usage of these containers. Why is this such a bad practice? This code needs to be as fast as possible, but memory usage isn't as much of a concern. Thanks –  dem246 May 31 '11 at 23:39
1  
Because there's no reason to dynamically allocate them. Make them automatic variables instead. This has nothing to do with the containers specifcally, but generally how one uses objects in C++, period. If you're messing with pointers all the time in modern C++ there's a problem. That's what scoped_ptr, unique_ptr, shared_ptr, auto_ptr and friends are for. (Of course if you're interfacing with some C API that's always going to be different ;) ) –  Billy ONeal Jun 1 '11 at 0:33
1  
While you're at it you would probably be happier with std::vector instead of std::list. –  Billy ONeal Jun 1 '11 at 0:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Deallocate the objects in the reverse order that you allocated them.

Allocation:

someStruct->arrayMap = new std::list<BasisIndex>*[someStruct->mapSizeX];
for(int i=0; i<someStruct->mapSizeX; i++){  
    someStruct->arrayMap[i] = new std::list<BasisIndex>[someStruct->mapSizeY];
}

Deallocation:

for (int i=0; i<someStruct->mapSizeX; i++){
    delete[] someStruct->arrayMap[i];
}
delete[] someStruct->arrayMap;
share|improve this answer
    
The order shouldn't matter. –  Billy ONeal May 31 '11 at 23:00
    
Sure it does. How are you going to delete[] someStruct->arrayMap[i] if you delete[] someStruct->arrayMap first? –  Marlon May 31 '11 at 23:03
1  
Yes, that's true -- that does matter. However, you can nuke the someStruct->arrayMap[i]s in any order. It need not be the reverse order in which they were allocated. –  Billy ONeal May 31 '11 at 23:38
    
I knew we had misunderstood each other. =) –  Marlon May 31 '11 at 23:50

someStruct->arrayMap[x][y].~list(); <-- You should not call the destructor manually. (I didn't even know it was valid to do it that way when placement new wasn't used first...) You need to use delete instead.

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