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I have a parent object with a child collection containing one element, the child collection contains a "grandchild" collection containing 3 elements.

I am loading the parent object from the database using NHibernate as follows

Parent parentObject = session.Query<Parent>()
    .FetchMany(x => x.Children)
    .ThenFetchMany(x => x.GrandChildren)
    .Where(x => x.Id = "someparentid")
    .Single();

What I'm finding is that there are duplicate children objects (3 in total) attached to the parent object when there should be only one. (There are 3 grandchild objects correctly attached to each child.) Eager loading the children collection only works correctly.

Do you know how I can achieve loading of the full parent object without duplicate children?

share|improve this question

If you map Children and GrandChildren as set, you can avoid the cartesian product. You need to define Children and Grandchildren as collections:

public class Parent
{
    ...
    public virtual ICollection<Child> Children { get; set; }
    ...
}

public class Child
{
    ...
    public virtual ICollection<GrandChild> GrandChildren { get; set; }
    ...
}

And in the mapping (using FluentNHibernate):

public class ParentMapping : ClassMap<Parent>
{
    public ParentMapping()
    {
        ...
        HasMany(x => x.Children)
            .KeyColumn("ParentID")
            .Inverse
            .AsSet()
        ...
    }
}

public class ChildMapping : ClassMap<Child>
{
    public ChildMapping()
    {
        ...
        HasMany(x => x.GrandChildren)
            .KeyColumn("ChildID")
            .Inverse
            .AsSet()
        ...
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
To be precise, the query still delivers the cartesian product, but you will get a single Perent. – kay.herzam Jun 1 '11 at 5:21
    
Is there a downside to this approach that you wouldn't experience by using QueryOver? – 2-bits Mar 1 '12 at 22:23
    
Thanks for this. I found that in a similar case the AsSet directive was enough to warrant no more duplicates – mabian69 Aug 27 '12 at 15:58
    
This just stopped a 2 days hunt for a solution. Thanks a lot. – Ibn Feb 3 '15 at 13:21
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I was able to use the answer here using QueryOver, it correctly loads the objects while generating efficient SQL (selects per table instead of one huge join).

share|improve this answer

You can't do it with NHibernate (I don't think you can do it with EF4 either) since your result is a Cartesian product. You're getting all results from all tables.

NHibernate doesn't know how to map the results from both collections back to the root. So for each Children, you get the same number of GrandChildren, and for each GrandChildren you end up with the same number of Children.

share|improve this answer
    
@j0k - Thanks for edit, haven't had morning coffee yet :) – Phill Jun 1 '11 at 0:11
    
I've profiled the SQL query being generated and there are two left joins, with a join condition on primary key and foreign key on both, so I am fairly sure it is not a cartesian product. I have achieved this using LinqToSql in the past. – Simon Jun 1 '11 at 0:15
    
@Simon - Take the query and put it into SQL Server Management Studio and run the query, you will see all results from all tables. It IS possible to achieve the same result but you would have to write HQL. See Ayende's blog for deep object graphs - ayende.com/blog/2580/efficently-loading-deep-object-graphs – Phill Jun 1 '11 at 0:21
1  
You can do it with Entity Framework. Currently, I happen to be making a repository interface that supports both EF and NHibernate. It's a big disappointment that NHibernate's ThenFetchMany is next to useless; EF can fetch the whole object graph with just one query(without the excuses of Cartesian product), yet there's no resulting duplicates in parent, nor children, nor grandchildren – Michael Buen Aug 13 '11 at 23:56

If you are using Linq, you can simplify it with this:

int parentId = 1;
var p1 = session.Query<Parent>().Where(x => x.ParentId == parentId);

p1
.FetchMany(x => x.Children)
.ToFuture();

sess.Query<Child>()
.Where(x => x.Parent.ParentId == parentId);
.FetchMany(x => x.GrandChildren)
.ToFuture();

Parent p = p1.ToFuture().Single();

Detailed explanation here: http://www.ienablemuch.com/2012/08/solving-nhibernate-thenfetchmany.html

share|improve this answer

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