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From the table below, how would I select all animalIds that have a specific combination of attributeIds e.g. if I supplied attributeIds 455 & 685 I'd expect to get back animalIds 55 & 93

Table name: animalAttributes

id      attributeId     animalId
1       455             55
2       233             55
3       685             55
4       999             89
5       455             89
6       333             93
7       685             93
8       455             93

I have the following query that seems to work, however, I'm not sure if there is a more robust way?

  SELECT animalId
    FROM animalAttributes
   WHERE attributeId IN (455,685)
GROUP BY animalId 
  HAVING COUNT(DISTINCT attributeId) = 2;
share|improve this question
    
I think this query will not give you what you want. It is conceivable for an animal to have 455 attribute, and another, say, 123. This would return since it has two. –  tofutim May 31 '11 at 23:40
    
123 wouldn't be in the criteria, so wouldn't be included. –  MarkD May 31 '11 at 23:41
    
There's no need for Having clause HAVING COUNT(DISTINCT attributeId) = 2 –  bpgergo May 31 '11 at 23:42
    
@MarkD, you are right. –  tofutim May 31 '11 at 23:45
    
The having clause is ensuring they have both attributes. This query looks OK to me. –  MarkD May 31 '11 at 23:45

4 Answers 4

If you really want accurate results, you could go with a fool-proof method like this:

select distinct base.animalId
from animalAttributes base
join animalAttributes a on base.animalId = a.animalId
     and a.attributeId = 455
where base.attributeId = 685

If you later needed 3 matching attributes, you could just add another join:

select distinct base.animalId
from animalAttributes base
join animalAttributes a on base.animalId = a.animalId
     and a.attributeId = 455
join animalAttributes b on base.animalId = b.animalId
     and b.attributeId = 999
where base.attributeId = 685
share|improve this answer
    
when you say "fool-proof", how is this more robust? Thanks –  raider5 May 31 '11 at 23:54
    
@raider5 it was directed at the OPs query that he says 'seems to work.' Also some of the other answers don't give me the warm fuzzies that they will work. –  Fosco May 31 '11 at 23:56

I would write it as

SELECT `a455`.`animalId`
FROM (SELECT `animalId` FROM `animalAttributes` WHERE `attributeId` = 455) AS `a455`
JOIN (SELECT `animalId` FROM `animalAttributes` WHERE `attributeId` = 685) AS `a685`
ON `a455`.`animalId` = `a685`.animalId`

This approach can be extended to handle even queries such as "animals with attributes 455 and 685, but not 123", which is going to be really difficult with a simple COUNT(DISTINCT).

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If you used USING you can do away with the aliasses. USING(`animalId`) (instead of the ON condition) –  Halcyon May 31 '11 at 23:48
    
Thanks for the suggestion. I have no strong preference between ON or USING, and USING would save on typing here without impacting readability, but I generally use aliases in self-joins and subqueries even when not strictly needed, just so that you can more easily modify it to (shortened) FROM a455 JOIN a685 LEFT JOIN a123 WHERE a123.animalId IS NULL. –  hvd May 31 '11 at 23:59
SELECT DISTINCT `animalId` FROM `animalAttributes` WHERE `attributeId` = 455
INTERSECT
SELECT DISTINCT `animalId` FROM `animalAttributes` WHERE `attributeId` = 685
share|improve this answer
SELECT DISTINCT animalId
FROM animalAttributes
WHERE attributeId IN (455,685)

or

SELECT animalId
FROM animalAttributes
WHERE attributeId IN (455,685)
GROUP BY animalId
share|improve this answer
    
This will return animalIds even if they only have one of the attributeId values. –  MarkD May 31 '11 at 23:38
    
@MarkD - It needs to be based on a combination of 455 AND 685 rather than 455 OR 685. I'm guessing your query would return animalIds 55,89,93? –  raider5 May 31 '11 at 23:45

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