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console.log(0.5 | 0); // 0
console.log(-1 | 0);  // -1
console.log(1 | 0);   // 1

Why does 0.5 | 0 return zero, but any integer (including negative) returns the input integer? What does the single pipe ("|") do?

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3 Answers

up vote 32 down vote accepted

This is a bitwise or.
Since bitwise operations only make sense on integers, 0.5 is truncated.

0 | x is x, for any x.

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+1 Interesting.. I would have assumed rounding up. –  Demian Brecht Jun 1 '11 at 0:18
    
@Demian: Why would you assume that? I should have said truncated. (edited) –  SLaks Jun 1 '11 at 0:20
    
Ah, truncated makes more sense :) (would have assumed truncation, but as you stated rounding, figured you might know something I didn't ;)) –  Demian Brecht Jun 1 '11 at 0:22
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Bit comparison is so simple it's almost incomprehensible ;) Check out this "nybble"

   8 4 2 1
   -------
   0 1 1 0 = 6  (4 + 2)
   1 0 1 0 = 10 (8 + 2)
   =======
   1 1 1 0 = 14 (8 + 4 + 2)

Bitwise ORing 6 and 10 will give you 14:

   alert(6 | 10); // should show 14

Terribly confusing!

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Rofl, thank you for pointing this out. Very interesting. –  Matrym Jun 1 '11 at 0:29
    
Works for Boolean as well. JS interprets true as 1, false as 0; so alert(true | false) //yields 1; alert(true | true) //yields 1; alert(false | true) //yields 1; alert(false | false) //yields 0 –  gordon Feb 18 at 15:41
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A single pipe is a bit-wise OR.

Performs the OR operation on each pair of bits. a OR b yields 1 if either a or b is 1.

JavaScript truncates any non-integer numbers, so its computed as 0|0, which is 0.

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This doesn't answer the question. ("Why does this return 0") –  Kirk Woll Jun 1 '11 at 0:18
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