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My first implementation idea is to do simply:

bool hasUpperCase (string str) {
    if(string.IsNullOrEmpty(str))
         return false;
    for (int i = 0; i < str.Length; i++) {
        if (char.IsUpper (str[i]))
            return true;                    
    }
    return false;
}

but maybe there is another faster way to do that ?

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3  
I would consider this "fast enough". –  BoltClock Jun 1 '11 at 1:19
1  
I think that is a good approach, you could use LINQ to do the work of the for loop, but the generated code would be equivalent. You could also test that the original string is not equal to the string converted to lower case, but I would expect that to be less performant as it would always require a full traverse of the string. –  Clayton Jun 1 '11 at 1:23
    
There might be some perfomance issues with using LINQ instead of a for-loop –  AlexInTime Oct 8 '13 at 12:40

6 Answers 6

up vote 30 down vote accepted

You could reduce that to

bool HasUpperCase (string str) {
    return !string.IsNullOrEmpty(str) && str.Any(c => char.IsUpper(c));
}

using LINQ.

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1  
e reduce again to: return !string.IsNullOrEmpty(password) && password.Any(char.IsUpper); –  Luiz Freneda May 21 '13 at 20:51
    
so, if you have the string "12345", then HasUpperCase would still return true .. there is the need for checking of A-Z –  SmartPC Informatica Aug 5 '13 at 14:35

Cheating from here:

bool hasUpperCase (string str) {
 if(string.IsNullOrEmpty(str))
     return false;

  return str != str.ToLower();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Needs a null check. –  BoltClock Jun 1 '11 at 1:23
    
How efficient is this? You need to make a copy of the string just to do the comparison. –  Yuck Jun 1 '11 at 1:24
    
@BoltClock: Thanks! –  Peter K. Jun 1 '11 at 1:24
    
@Yuck: True! I'm not sure it's any more efficient. –  Peter K. Jun 1 '11 at 1:26

ok - time for the new truth!

This was a test for any upper case character in a string.

The string was guaranteed to not have any upper case character within the first 60K of characters. (I created the string from random.org)

I prevented string substitution optimization in the compiler by randomizing which 64K character string was passed to the test function.

All timings were very strictly around the actual test, and did not include function calling time.

I ran the test once, 10 times, and again for 10,000 times and averaged each set of the timings for each test.

I ran the test on a 64bit Win 7 with i3-2100 CPU @ 3.1 Ghz

Test Case 1:

   static bool testCaseOne(string str, out double ms)
    {
        bool result = false;
        DateTime start = DateTime.Now;

        result = !string.IsNullOrEmpty(str) && str.Any(c => char.IsUpper(c));
        ms = (DateTime.Now - start).TotalMilliseconds;
        return result;
    }

Resulting average time:

  1. 1 X = 3.000 ms
  2. 10 x = 0.860 ms
  3. 10,000 x = 0.821 ms

Test Case 2:

    static bool testCaseTwo(string str, out double ms)
    {
        bool result = false;
        DateTime start = DateTime.Now;

        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(str))
        {
            ms = 0;
            return false;
        }
        result = Regex.IsMatch(str, "[A-Z]");

        ms = (DateTime.Now - start).TotalMilliseconds;

        return result;
    }

Resulting average time:

  1. 1 x = 2.000 ms
  2. 10 x = 1.597 ms
  3. 10,000 x = 1.603 ms

Test Case 3:

   static bool testCaseThree(string str, out double ms)
    {
        bool result = false;
        DateTime start = DateTime.Now;

        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(str))
        {
            ms = 0;
            return false;
        }
        for (int i = 0; i < str.Length; i++)
        {
            if (char.IsUpper(str[i]))
            {
                result = true;
                break;
            }
        }
        ms = (DateTime.Now - start).TotalMilliseconds;
        return result;
    }

Resulting average time:

  1. 1 x = 1.000 ms
  2. 10 x = 0.357 ms
  3. 10,000 x = 0.298 ms

Test Case 4:

    static bool testCaseFour(string str, out double ms)
    {
        bool result = false;
        DateTime start = DateTime.Now;

        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(str))
        {
            ms = 0;
            return false;
        }
        for (int i = 0; i < str.Length; i++)
        {

            if (str[i] > 64 && str[i] < 91)
            {
                result = true;
                break;
            }
        }
        ms = (DateTime.Now - start).TotalMilliseconds;
        return result;
    }

}

Resulting average time:

  1. 1 x = 0.000 ms
  2. 10 x = 0.137 ms
  3. 10,000 x = 0.184 ms

Interesting.

I hope this statisfies Mr. R. K. ;)

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You do realize that case 1 & 4 are identical yet have different timing results? –  Robert Koritnik Apr 2 at 9:36
    
must have copied the wrong code - that was so long ago, I don't remember what I did for case 4...Sorry! –  Robert Achmann Apr 2 at 13:51
    
Ok, since I was so badly beaten up by Mr. Koritnik (sob), I updated my answer above... ;) –  Robert Achmann Apr 2 at 16:02
bool hasUpperCase(string str) {
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(str))
        return false;
    return Regex.IsMatch(str, "[A-Z]");
}

Disclaimer: I am no Regex expert but I tested this with the strings Testing, testinG, and tesTing, which all evaluated to true. However, it also evaluated to true with the string TESTING, which you may or may not want.

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The code looks fine to me, since you ask for performance, you can reduce the for loop from O(n) to O(n/2 + ~1) by adding the conditional checking from the reverse side.

Otherwise you can check two sub-sequent elements and increment the i by 2. Obviously you should check for i < str.Length for the second argument.

bool hasUpperCase (string str) {
if(string.IsNullOrEmpty(str))
     return false;
for (int i = 0; i < str.Length; i= i + 2) {
    if (char.IsUpper (str[i]))
        return true;                    

    if ((i + 1) < str.Length && char.IsUpper (str[i+1]))
        return true;                    
}
return false;

}

IMHO, this tip may help to answer algorithm interview, doesn't get much performance.

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    public static string Upper_To_Lower(string text)
    {
        if (Char.IsUpper(text[0]) == true) { text = text.Replace(text[0], char.ToLower(text[0])); return text; }

        return text;
    }

    public static string Lower_To_Upper(string text)
    {
        if (Char.IsLower(text[0]) == true) { text = text.Replace(text[0], char.ToUpper(text[0])); return text; }

        return text;
    }

Here i made 2 simple methods who check the first letter of any string and convert it from Upper to Lower and virse verca .... hope that will help you.

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