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Can anyone explain IEnumerable and IEnumerator to me?

What are the differences between IEnumerator and IEnumerable?

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Duplicate: stackoverflow.com/questions/558304/… –  Andrew Hare Mar 6 '09 at 18:02
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marked as duplicate by Andrew Hare, Jon B, Shog9, George Stocker, Daniel Earwicker Mar 9 '09 at 12:56

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4 Answers

up vote 47 down vote accepted

IEnumerable is an interface that defines one method GetEnumerator which returns an IEnumerator interface, this in turn allows readonly access to a collection. A collection that implements IEnumerable can be used with a foreach statement.

Definition

IEnumerable 

public IEnumerator GetEnumerator();

IEnumerator

public object Current;
public void Reset();
public bool MoveNext();

example code from codebetter.com

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BtBh, your code doesn't make any sense. IEnumerable defines a method which returns an IEnumerable? And you are saying IEnumerable has GetEnumerator, and then IEnumerable also has Current, Reset and MoveNext. That is not correct... –  Rex M Mar 6 '09 at 16:58
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@Rex M: I think the code does make sense. IEnumerable has a method GetEnumerator which returns an IEnumer*ator*, not IEnumer*able*. –  Lernkurve Jun 17 '10 at 8:13
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@Lernkurve the answer was modified to be correct after I posted my comment. –  Rex M Jun 17 '10 at 8:35
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An IEnumerator is a thing that can enumerate: it has the MoveNext, Current, and Reset methods (which in .NET code you probably won't call explicitly, though you could).

An IEnumerable is a thing that can be enumerated...which simply means that it has a GetEnumerator method that returns an IEnumerator.

Which do you use? The only reason to use IEnumerator is if you have something that has a nonstandard way of enumerating (that is, of returning its various elements one-by-one), and you need to define how that works. You'd create a new class implementing IEnumerator. But you'd still need to return that IEnumerator in an IEnumerable class.

For a look at what an enumerator (implementing IEnumerator<T>) looks like, see any Enumerator<T> class, such as the ones contained in List<T>, Queue<T>, or Stack<T>. For a look at a class implementing IEnumerable, see any standard collection class.

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An Enumerator shows you the items in a list or collection. Each instance of an Enumerator is a a certain position (the 1st element, the 7th element, etc) and can give you that element (IEnumerator.Current) or move to the next one (IEnumerator.MoveNext). When you write a foreach loop in C#, the compiler generates code that uses an Enumerator.

An Enumerable is a class that can give you Enumerators. It has a method called GetEnumerator which gives you an Enumerator that looks at its items. When you write a foreach loop in C#, the code that it generates calls GetEnumerator to create the Enumerator used by the loop.

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Get More About IEnumerable,IList and ICollection in c# here vishalpatwardhan.com/2012/01/… –  Vishal Patwardhan Jan 21 '12 at 14:15
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That blog post is rather inaccurate. –  SLaks Jan 22 '12 at 2:34
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IEnumerable and IEnumerator are both interfaces. IEnumerable has just one method called GetEnumerator. This method retuns (as all methods return something including void) another type which is an interface and that interface is IEnumerator. When you implement enumerator logic in any of your collection class, you implement IEnumerable (either generic or non generic). IEnumerable has just one method whereas IEnumerator has 2 methods (MoveNext and Reset) and a property Current. For easy understanding consider IEnumebale a box that contains IEnumerator inside it (though not through inheritance or containment). See the code for better understanding:

    class Test : IEnumerable, IEnumerator
    {
         IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
        {
            throw new NotImplementedException();
        }

        public object Current
        {
            get { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
        }

        public bool MoveNext()
        {
            throw new NotImplementedException();
        }
        public void Reset()
        {
            throw new NotImplementedException();
        }
    }
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