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I'm pretty familiar with when to use subclasses and modules, but more recently I've been seeing nested classes like this:

class Foo
  class Bar
    # do some useful things
  end
end

As well as classes nested in modules like so:

module Baz
  class Quux
    # more code
  end
end

Either documentation and articles are sparse or I'm not educated on the subject enough to grope for the right search terms, but I can't seem to locate much information on the topic.

Could somebody provide examples or links to posts on why/when those techniques would be used?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 62 down vote accepted

What you are referring to is know as an inner class. In OOP an inner class serves the purpose of defining a class which cannot be instantiated without being bound to an upper level class. For instance:

class Car
  class Wheel
  end
end

differs from

class Car
end

class Wheel
end

because the first makes explicit that the Car::Wheel class can only represent a car wheel, as opposed to a general wheel. Often using inner classes is a matter of preference, but it serves a purpose in the sense that it more strongly enforces a contract between the two classes and in doing so conveys more information about them and their uses.

As for your second observation, classes nested inside of modules are generally used to namespace the classes. For instance:

module ActiveRecord
  class Base
  end
end

differs from

module ActionMailer
  class Base
  end
end

Although this is not the only use of classes nested inside of modules, it is generally the most common.

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1  
What do you mean by "bound" in "which cannot be instantiated without being bound to an upper level class"? –  Andrew Grimm Jun 1 '11 at 3:01
2  
@Andrew Grimm, I mean that you cannot instantiate the lower level class (Car::Wheel) without calling the upper level class (Car). In that sense it is 'bound' to the upper level class. You can also think of this as Car::Wheel cannot exist without Car. In that sense Car::Wheel is bound to Car. –  Pan Thomakos Jun 1 '11 at 3:21
4  
@rubyprince, I'm not sure what you mean by establishing a relation between Car.new and Car::Wheel.new. You definitely don't need to initialize a Car object to initialize a Car::Wheel object in Ruby, but the Car class must be loaded and executed for Car::Wheel to be usable. –  Pan Thomakos Jun 2 '11 at 19:08
6  
@Pan, you are confusing Java inner classes and namespaced Ruby classes. A non-static Java nested class is called an inner class and it exists only within an instance of the outer class. There is a hidden field that allows outward references. The Ruby inner class is simply namespaced and is not "bound" to the enclosing class in any way. It is equivalent to a Java static (nested) class. Yes, the answer has a lot of votes but it is not completely accurate. –  DigitalRoss Mar 12 at 18:09
1  
The use of the term "inner class" and the discussion of "Inner Classes in OOP" and binding is confusing, particularly for programmers with knowledge of Java (largely agreeing with @DigitalRoss here). Both of the OP's examples are just namespacing. –  Tim Diggins Mar 18 at 13:07

In Ruby, defining an inner class is similar to defining the inner class in a module. It doesn't actually force an association between the classes, just a namespace.

class A; class B; end; end
A::B.new

The main difference is that of course you can't create an instance of a module, so using a class to namespace an implementation might suggest a more obvious way to create the root object, which might be the only user-API object.

I wish I had an exotic use for this construct to demonstrate, but it's just about keeping to modular design principles (for example, in a large program it makes it easier to trace use of your API back to your module) and adding only a single name to the global scope, to minimize the chances of collisions.

I use the pattern even for scripts, where the namespace isn't much use, just to keep my OO reflexes from acting up...

class A
  class Realwork_A
    ...
  end
  class Realwork_B
    ...
  end
  ...
  self
end.new.run
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Please, pretty please, don't call this an inner class. It's not. The class B is not inside class A. The constant B is namespaced inside class A, but there is absolutely no relationship between the object referenced by B (which in this case just happens to be a class) and the class referenced by A. –  Jörg W Mittag Oct 16 at 9:23

You probably want to use this to group your classes into a module. Sort of a namespace thing.

for example the Twitter gem uses namespaces to achieve this:

Twitter::Client.new

Twitter::Search.new

So both Client and Search classes live under the Twitter module.

If you want to check the sources, the code for both classes can be found here and here.

Hope this helps!

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2  
Twitter gem updated link: github.com/sferik/twitter/tree/master/lib/twitter –  kode Mar 10 '13 at 17:44

In the addition to previous answers: Module in Ruby is a class

$ irb
> module Some end
=> nil
> Some.class
=> Module
> Module.superclass
=> Object
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1  
You'd be more accurate to say that 'class in Ruby is a module'! –  Tim Diggins Mar 18 at 13:05

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