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I have multiple classes that are not allowed to modify each other's fields, but instead must request to modify by adding a request object to the Main class's queue. The Main class, at the end of each loop, will perform the requested modifications.

public class Main {

    public static ClassA a = new ClassA();
    public static ClassB b = new ClassB();

    private static List<Request> requestQueue = new ArrayList<Request>(); // List holds all requests

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        while (true) {
            a.tick();
            b.tick();
            for (Request r : requestQueue) {
                r.field = r.value; // All requests are fulfilled 
            }
            requestQueue.clear();
        }
    }

    public static <ValueType> void addModificationRequest(ValueType field,
            ValueType value) {
        requestQueue.add(new Request<ValueType>(field, value));
    }
}

// Request Object
public class Request<ValueType> {

    ValueType field;
    ValueType value;

    public Request(ValueType field, ValueType value) {
        this.field = field;
        this.value = value;
    }
}

// Classes
public class ClassA {
    String name = "A";

    public void tick() {
        Main.addModificationRequest(Main.b.name, "NewNameB"); // Try to change b name
    }
}

public class ClassB {
    String name = "B";

    public void tick() {
        // Nothing
    }
}

I know the code is messy, but its the simplest way I have thought of so far. Does anyone know any good design patterns that can accomplish this in a simpler and more robust way? (Note: I must have it this way, there is no possibility of allowing the classes to directly modify each other.)

Edit: The classes will have more than one modifiable variable. I also need to determine if any requests try to modify the same variable, so I can ignore one or both.

Edit: Thanks for all the help, I really appreciate it! I have decided to let the classes keep track of their own modifications. I am also going to use the same Request object I have been using because it is simple and straightforward. Again, thank you.

share|improve this question
    
Interesting problem. How come you can't have the objects modify each other directly? –  Buhb Jun 1 '11 at 4:09
    
Notice how the tick function of a & b is called in succession. If the a was allowed to modify b before its tick, this would change the result of b's tick. If there are many classes, I plan to have thousands, this would result in a huge changes. The solution is to not modify until the end of each loop, plus the main class should be able to sort through the requests, and, as an example, throw a "ConcurrentModificationException." –  scientiaesthete Jun 1 '11 at 4:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Maybe this doesn't apply for your use case, but you could have the objects themself keep track of pending modifications, and then have a call, made from your main class, that modifies the actual fields themself.

If you only need the set operation, keeping track of modifications is as easy as keeping an extra field for each field in the class. If you need a series of, say, arithmetic operations, you can use a list of modifications.

public class DelayedModificationField<T> {
    private T field;
    private T newValue;
    public T get() { return field;}
    public delayedSet(T value) {
        if (newValue != null) throw new ConcurrentModificationException("error");
        newValue = value;
    }
    public void performSet() {
        field = newValue;
        newValue = null;
    }

public ExampleClass {
    private DelayedModificationField<String> myField = new DelayedModificationField<String>();
    public void setMyField(String s) { myField.delayedSet(s);}
    public String getMyField() { return myField.get();}
    public void performSet() { myField.performSet();}
}

Your main class must keep track of all objects supporting delayed modification and call performSet on them each tick. Make them implement an interface and keep them in a list.

share|improve this answer
    
See the edit. And unfortunately, I need a controlling class that keeps classes from conflicting with each other. –  scientiaesthete Jun 1 '11 at 4:34
    
Can the class itself, given two or more modifications to the same field, decide which modifications to ignore? In that case, the solution with keeping track of possible modifications in a list might still work. –  Buhb Jun 1 '11 at 4:44
    
I was actually using that for some time, but then scrapped it thinking that the classes wouldn't have enough information to decide, and giving each one the info and writing their own decision code would be a pain. One ruling class is easier and simpler. But, I still haven't ruled that out. Do you have any reasons why your idea might be better, hearing some might make my choice easier. –  scientiaesthete Jun 1 '11 at 4:56
    
Well, it depends. If the rules for conflict resolution are the same, you can wrap it all in a generic class holding one field, rules for conflict resolution, and list of modifications. This could then be used for all fields that must support the delayed modification. If the rules for conflict resolution differ much, then maybe this isn't a good fit. –  Buhb Jun 1 '11 at 5:45
    
Well, I have decided that I'll let the objects keep track of modifications because it is much more flexible, even though I might have to use the same decision code many times. Can you add the info from previous comments, and maybe some example code, so that I can except your answer. Thanks! –  scientiaesthete Jun 1 '11 at 22:35

This isn't going to work. I don't know the exact parameters of your assignment, but I would define an interface Modifiable with a single method void setField(ValueType newValue). Then I would declare ClassA and ClassB to implement Modifiable. Finally, redefine your Request class to be a Modifiable and a ValueType instead of two ValueType fields. Your queue loop would then be:

for (Request r : requestQueue) {
    r.modifiable.setField(r.value);
}

EDIT:

Here's a modification of this approach that is extendable to multiple fields:

interface Modifiable {
    void setName(String newName);
    void setAge(Integer newAge); // I wish
}

abstract class Request<ValueType> {
    Modifiable object;
    ValueType value;

    public Request(Modifiable object, ValueType value) {
        this.object = object;
        this.value = value;
    }

    abstract void execute();
}

class RequestNameChange extends Request<String> {
    public RequestNameChange(Modifiable object, String name) {
        super(object, name);
    }

    void execute() {
        object.setName(name);
    }
}

// etc.

Another approach would be to use reflection, but I suspect that isn't what your assignment is about.

share|improve this answer
    
I should have mentioned that the classes may have more than one variable that should be modifiable, so this wouldn't work. I could add a String naming the variable, but it is just more work adding all names to the function. –  scientiaesthete Jun 1 '11 at 4:14
    
I added a couple of suggestions to my answer. –  Ted Hopp Jun 1 '11 at 4:31
    
This would work for the example I gave, but when I have hundreds of objects, it would be a pain to create a request object for each variable change. If you look at my example, I am able to pass any variable and an appropriate value to request constructor. (Note: This is not a homework assignment. I meant "assignment" as assigning a value to the variable.) –  scientiaesthete Jun 1 '11 at 4:44
    
If you want this to scale to hundreds of object classes, you will need to use reflection. If you have hundreds of object instances, you're going to need a request object instance for each change no matter what. The number of request object classes won't grow with the number of instance objects, though. –  Ted Hopp Jun 1 '11 at 4:54
    
Yes, I'll have hundreds of classes, and I'm trying to avoid reflection because of speed concerns. It's just too slow. Did you try looking at my code, any improvements you can suggest? –  scientiaesthete Jun 1 '11 at 5:03

Try the "hollywood" pattern - it employs a "don't call us, we'll call you" style, aka using "callback" code.

Like this:

public static class Main {

    public static ClassA a = new ClassA();
    public static ClassB b = new ClassB();

    private static List<Runnable> requestQueue = new ArrayList<Runnable>(); // List holds all requests

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        while (true) {
            a.tick();
            b.tick();
            for (Runnable r : requestQueue) {
                r.run(); // All requests are fulfilled 
            }
            requestQueue.clear();
        }
    }

    public static void addModificationRequest(Runnable runnable) {
        requestQueue.add(runnable);
    }
}

Call addModificationRequest using an anonymous class:

Main.addModificationRequest(new Runnable() {
    public void run() {
        Main.b.name = "NewNameB";
    }
});

Note that this code will throw a ConcurrentModificationException if addModificationRequest is called while the foreach loop is executing. A cheap fix would be to add the keyword synchronized to addModificationRequest and execute the loop + clear within a synchronized block using the class object as the lock.

Edit:

To pass in the field too, so you can check it, try this:

interface FieldUpdater extends Runnable
{
    Field getField();
}

static class Main
{

    public static ClassA a = new ClassA();
    public static ClassB b = new ClassB();

    private static List<FieldUpdater> requestQueue = new ArrayList<FieldUpdater>(); // List holds all requests

    private static Set<Field> seenBefore = new HashSet<Field>();

    public void main(String args[])
    {
        while (true)
        {
            a.tick();
            b.tick();
            for (FieldUpdater r : requestQueue)
            {
                if (seenBefore.contains(r.getField()))
                {
                    continue; // Or do something else specific
                }
                seenBefore.add(r.getField());
                r.run();
            }
            requestQueue.clear();
        }
    }

    public synchronized static void addModificationRequest(FieldUpdater fieldUpdater)
    {
        requestQueue.add(fieldUpdater);
    }
}

Then call your method like this:

    Main.addModificationRequest(new FieldUpdater()
    {
        public void run()
        {
            Main.b.name = "NewNameB";
        }

        public Field getField()
        {
            return Main.class.getField("name");
        }

    });

Note that for clarity I have deliberately omitted dealing with the Exceptions that can be thrown from getField(). Also, this is not good code design, but it does address fixing your code as stated.

share|improve this answer
    
That would be perfect, but I need to be able to see if two requests overlap, meaning they try to change the same variable. I can't allow this, or must give one request precedence over the other. –  scientiaesthete Jun 1 '11 at 4:26
    
See edit for some code that will do this –  Bohemian Jun 1 '11 at 5:44

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