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To aid in debugging some code I'm working on, I started to write a method to recursively print out the names and values of an object's properties. However, most of the objects contain nested types and I'd like to print their names and values too, but only on the types I have defined.

Here's an outline of what I have so far:

public void PrintProperties(object obj)
{
    if (obj == null)
        return;

    Propertyinfo[] properties = obj.GetType().GetProperties();

    foreach (PropertyInfo property in properties)
    {
        if ([property is a type I have defined])
        {
            PrintProperties([instance of property's type]);
        }
        else
        {
            Console.WriteLine("{0}: {1}", property.Name, property.GetValue(obj, null));
        }
    }

The parts between the braces are where I'm unsure.

Any help will be greatly appreciated.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 15 down vote accepted

The code below has an attempt at that. For "type I have defined" I chose to look at the types in the same assembly as the ones the type whose properties are being printed, but you'll need to update the logic if your types are defined in multiple assemblies.

public void PrintProperties(object obj)
{
    PrintProperties(obj, 0);
}
public void PrintProperties(object obj, int indent)
{
    if (obj == null) return;
    string indentString = new string(' ', indent);
    Type objType = obj.GetType();
    PropertyInfo[] properties = objType.GetProperties();
    foreach (PropertyInfo property in properties)
    {
        object propValue = property.GetValue(obj, null);
        if (property.PropertyType.Assembly == objType.Assembly)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("{0}{1}:", indentString, property.Name);
            PrintProperties(propValue, indent + 2);
        }
        else
        {
            Console.WriteLine("{0}{1}: {2}", indentString, property.Name, propValue);
        }
    }
}
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1  
Legend! –  aligray Jun 1 '11 at 5:25
4  
This code doesn't detect cycles. If a cycle is present, it will end up throwing a StackOverflowException. –  Jordão Jun 1 '11 at 17:19
    
True, some sort of "already visited" list would need to be maintained if cycles were possible in the domain of the problem. Thanks for pointing it out. –  carlosfigueira Jun 1 '11 at 17:21
    
minute correction - last param in last Console.WriteLine should be {2} not {1} –  zam6ak Jun 10 '11 at 21:13
1  
It limits the recursion to only items in the same assembly of the type. Otherwise it would go on printing internal properties of classes such as string, Uri, DateTime, and so on. –  carlosfigueira Dec 12 '13 at 23:07

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