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Let's say I have the following simple table variable:

declare @databases table
(
    DatabaseID    int,
    Name        varchar(15),   
    Server      varchar(15)
)
-- insert a bunch rows into @databases

Is declaring and using a cursor my only option if I wanted to iterate through the rows? Is there another way?

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1  
Although I'm not sure the problem you see with the above approach; See if this helps.. databasejournal.com/features/mssql/article.php/3111031 –  Gishu Sep 15 '08 at 7:33
2  
Could you provide us the reason why you want to iterate over the rows, other solution that don't require iteration might exists (and which are faster by a large margin in most cases) –  Pop Catalin Sep 15 '08 at 11:21
    
agree with pop... may not need a cursor depending on the situation. but theres no problem with using cursors if you need to –  Shawn Oct 29 '08 at 23:09
    
    
I was reading about looping through a table variable with a cursor and came across this, is there a benefit to using the select, update iteration covered below instead of a cursor? –  Geronimo Jun 6 '12 at 16:25

15 Answers 15

up vote 109 down vote accepted

First of all you should be absolutely sure you need to iterate through each row - set based operations will perform faster in every case I can think of and will normally use simpler code.

Depending on your data it may be possible to loop just using select statements as shown below:

Declare @Id int

While (Select Count(*) From ATable Where Processed = 0) > 0
Begin
    Select Top 1 @Id = Id From ATable Where Processed = 0

    --Do some processing here

    Update ATable Set Processed = 1 Where Id = @Id 

End

Another alternative is to use a temporary table:

Select *
Into   #Temp
From   ATable

Declare @Id int

While (Select Count(*) From #Temp) > 0
Begin

    Select Top 1 @Id = Id From #Temp

    --Do some processing here

    Delete #Temp Where Id = @Id

End

The option you should choose really depends on the structure and volume of your data.

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"Select Top 1 @Id = Id From ATable" should be "Select Top 1 @Id = Id From ATable Where Processed = 0" –  Amzath Jan 21 '11 at 19:42
7  
If using SQL Server, see Josef's answer below for a small tweak to the above. –  Polshgiant Nov 22 '11 at 20:24
    
Just comment to say thank for your notification @Polshgiant :) and Martynw for the solution –  Shinigamae Aug 27 '12 at 3:44
    
Can you explain why this is better than using a cursor ? –  marco-fiset Oct 19 '12 at 13:51
    
Gave this one a downvote. Why should he avoid using a cursor? He's talking about iterating over table variable, not a traditional table. I don't believe the normal downsides of cursors applies here. If row-by-row processing is truly required (and as you point out he should be certain about that first) then using a cursor is a much better solution than the ones you describe here. –  nolan6000 Jun 27 '13 at 14:52

Just a quick note, if you are using SQL Server, the examples that have:

While (Select Count(*) From #Temp) > 0

Would be better served with

While EXISTS(SELECT * From #Temp)

The Count will have to touch every single row in the table, the EXISTS only needs to touch the first one.

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3  
This is not an answer but a comment/enhancement on Martynw answer. –  Nick May 30 '13 at 16:12
1  
The content of this note forces better formatting functionality than a comment, I would suggest to append at the Answer. –  Custódio Sep 26 '13 at 14:14

Here is how I would do it:

Select Identity(int, 1,1) AS PK, DatabaseID
Into   #T
From   @databases

Declare @maxPK int;Select @maxPK = MAX(PK) From #T
Declare @pk int;Set @pk = 1

While @pk <= @maxPK
Begin

    -- Get one record
    Select DatabaseID, Name, Server
    From @databases
    Where DatabaseID = (Select DatabaseID From #T Where PK = @pk)

    --Do some processing here
    -- 

    Select @pk = @pk + 1
End

[Edit] Because I probably skipped the word "variable" when I first time read the question, here is an updated response...


declare @databases table
(
    PK            int IDENTITY(1,1), 
    DatabaseID    int,
    Name        varchar(15),   
    Server      varchar(15)
)
-- insert a bunch rows into @databases
--/*
INSERT INTO @databases (DatabaseID, Name, Server) SELECT 1,'MainDB', 'MyServer'
INSERT INTO @databases (DatabaseID, Name, Server) SELECT 1,'MyDB',   'MyServer2'
--*/

Declare @maxPK int;Select @maxPK = MAX(PK) From @databases
Declare @pk int;Set @pk = 1

While @pk <= @maxPK
Begin

    /* Get one record (you can read the values into some variables) */
    Select DatabaseID, Name, Server
    From @databases
    Where PK = @pk

    /* Do some processing here */
    /* ... */ 

    Select @pk = @pk + 1
End
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3  
so basically youre doing a cursor, but without all of the benefits of a cursor –  Shawn Oct 6 '08 at 14:27
1  
... without locking the tables that are used while processing... as this is one of the benefits of a cursor :) –  leoinfo Oct 8 '08 at 16:49
2  
Tables? It's a table VARIABLE - there is no concurrent access possible. –  DenNukem Jan 19 '10 at 1:40
    
DenNukem, you're right, I think I "skipped" the word "variable" when I read the question at that time... I will add some notes to the my initial response –  leoinfo Jan 20 '10 at 16:57
    
I have to agree with DenNukem and Shawn. Why, why, why do you go to these lengths to avoid using a cursor? Again: he wants to iterate over a table variable, not a traditional table !!! –  nolan6000 Jun 27 '13 at 14:56

This is how I do it:

declare @RowNum int, @CustId nchar(5), @Name1 nchar(25)

select @CustId=MAX(USERID) FROM UserIDs     --start with the highest ID
Select @RowNum = Count(*) From UserIDs      --get total number of records
WHILE @RowNum > 0                          --loop until no more records
BEGIN   
    select @Name1 = username1 from UserIDs where USERID= @CustID    --get other info from that row
    print cast(@RowNum as char(12)) + ' ' + @CustId + ' ' + @Name1  --do whatever

    select top 1 @CustId=USERID from UserIDs where USERID < @CustID order by USERID desc--get the next one
    set @RowNum = @RowNum - 1                               --decrease count
END

No Cursors, no temporary tables, no extra columns. The USERID column must be a unique integer, as most Primary Keys are.

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Define your temp table like this -

declare @databases table
(
    RowID not null int identity(1,1) primary key,
    DatabaseID    int,
    Name        varchar(15),   
    Server      varchar(15)
)

-- insert a bunch rows into @databases

Then do this -

declare @i int
select @i = min(RowID) from @databases
declare @max int
select @max = max(RowID) from @databases

while @i <= @max begin
    select DatabaseID, Name, Server from @database where RowID = @i --do some stuff
    set @i = @i + 1
end
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If you have no choice than to go row by row creating a FAST_FORWARD cursor. It will be as fast as building up a while loop and much easier to maintain over the long haul.

FAST_FORWARD Specifies a FORWARD_ONLY, READ_ONLY cursor with performance optimizations enabled. FAST_FORWARD cannot be specified if SCROLL or FOR_UPDATE is also specified.

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1  
Yeah! As I commented elsewhere I have yet to see any arguments as to why NOT to use a cursor when the case is to iterate over a table variable. A FAST_FORWARDcursor is a fine solution. (upvote) –  nolan6000 Jun 27 '13 at 14:57

You can use a while loop:

While (Select Count(*) From #TempTable) > 0
Begin
    Insert Into @Databases...

    Delete From #TempTable Where x = x
End
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I really do not see the point why you would need to resort to using dreaded cursor. But here is another option if you are using SQL Server version 2005/2008
Use Recursion

declare @databases table
(
	DatabaseID    int,
	Name        varchar(15),   
	Server      varchar(15)
)

--; Insert records into @databases...

--; Recurse through @databases
;with DBs as (
	select * from @databases where DatabaseID = 1
	union all
	select A.* from @databases A 
		inner join DBs B on A.DatabaseID = B.DatabaseID + 1
)
select * from DBs
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-- [PO_RollBackOnReject]  'FININV10532'
alter procedure PO_RollBackOnReject
@CaseID nvarchar(100)

AS
Begin
SELECT  *
INTO    #tmpTable
FROM   PO_InvoiceItems where CaseID = @CaseID

Declare @Id int
Declare @PO_No int
Declare @Current_Balance Money


While (Select ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY PO_LineNo DESC) From #tmpTable) > 0
Begin
        Select Top 1 @Id = PO_LineNo, @Current_Balance = Current_Balance,
        @PO_No = PO_No
        From #Temp
        update PO_Details
        Set  Current_Balance = Current_Balance + @Current_Balance,
            Previous_App_Amount= Previous_App_Amount + @Current_Balance,
            Is_Processed = 0
        Where PO_LineNumber = @Id
        AND PO_No = @PO_No
        update PO_InvoiceItems
        Set IsVisible = 0,
        Is_Processed= 0
        ,Is_InProgress = 0 , 
        Is_Active = 0
        Where PO_LineNo = @Id
        AND PO_No = @PO_No
End
End
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Another approach without having to change your schema or using temp tables:

DECLARE @rowCount int = 0
  ,@currentRow int = 1
  ,@databaseID int
  ,@name varchar(15)
  ,@server varchar(15);

SELECT @rowCount = COUNT(*)
FROM @databases;

WHILE (@currentRow <= @rowCount)
BEGIN
  SELECT TOP 1
     @databaseID = rt.[DatabaseID]
    ,@name = rt.[Name]
    ,@server = rt.[Server]
  FROM (
    SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER (
        ORDER BY t.[DatabaseID], t.[Name], t.[Server]
       ) AS [RowNumber]
      ,t.[DatabaseID]
      ,t.[Name]
      ,t.[Server]
    FROM @databases t
  ) rt
  WHERE rt.[RowNumber] = @currentRow;

  EXEC [your_stored_procedure] @databaseID, @name, @server;

  SET @currentRow = @currentRow + 1;
END
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I'm going to provide the set-based solution.

insert  @databases (DatabaseID, Name, Server)
select DatabaseID, Name, Server 
From ... (Use whatever query you would have used in the loop or cursor)

This is far faster than any looping techique and is easier to write and maintain.

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I agree with the previous post that set-based operations will typically perform better, but if you do need to iterate over the rows here's the approach I would take:

  1. Add a new field to your table variable (Data Type Bit, default 0)
  2. Insert your data
  3. Select the Top 1 Row where fUsed = 0 (Note: fUsed is the name of the field in step 1)
  4. Perform whatever processing you need to do
  5. Update the record in your table variable by setting fUsed = 1 for the record
  6. Select the next unused record from the table and repeat the process

    DECLARE @databases TABLE  
    (  
        DatabaseID  int,  
        Name        varchar(15),     
        Server      varchar(15),   
        fUsed       BIT DEFAULT 0  
    ) 
    
    -- insert a bunch rows into @databases
    
    DECLARE @DBID INT
    
    SELECT TOP 1 @DBID = DatabaseID from @databases where fUsed = 0 
    
    WHILE @@ROWCOUNT <> 0 and @DBID IS NOT NULL  
    BEGIN  
        -- Perform your processing here  
    
        --Update the record to "used" 
    
        UPDATE @databases SET fUsed = 1 WHERE DatabaseID = @DBID  
    
        --Get the next record  
        SELECT TOP 1 @DBID = DatabaseID from @databases where fUsed = 0   
    END
    
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This will work in SQL SERVER 2012 version.

declare @Rowcount int 
select @Rowcount=count(*) from AddressTable;

while( @Rowcount>0)
  begin 
 select @Rowcount=@Rowcount-1;
 SELECT * FROM AddressTable order by AddressId desc OFFSET @Rowcount ROWS FETCH NEXT 1 ROWS ONLY;
end 
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This is the code that I am using 2008 R2. This code that I am using is to build indexes on key fields (SSNO & EMPR_NO) n all tales

if object_ID('tempdb..#a')is not NULL drop table #a

select 'IF EXISTS (SELECT name FROM sysindexes WHERE name ='+CHAR(39)+''+'IDX_'+COLUMN_NAME+'_'+SUBSTRING(table_name,5,len(table_name)-3)+char(39)+')' 
+' begin DROP INDEX [IDX_'+COLUMN_NAME+'_'+SUBSTRING(table_name,5,len(table_name)-3)+'] ON '+table_schema+'.'+table_name+' END Create index IDX_'+COLUMN_NAME+'_'+SUBSTRING(table_name,5,len(table_name)-3)+ ' on '+ table_schema+'.'+table_name+' ('+COLUMN_NAME+') '   'Field'
,ROW_NUMBER() over (order by table_NAMe) as  'ROWNMBR'
into #a
from INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS
where (COLUMN_NAME like '%_SSNO_%' or COLUMN_NAME like'%_EMPR_NO_')
    and TABLE_SCHEMA='dbo'

declare @loopcntr int
declare @ROW int
declare @String nvarchar(1000)
set @loopcntr=(select count(*)  from #a)
set @ROW=1  

while (@ROW <= @loopcntr)
    begin
        select top 1 @String=a.Field 
        from #A a
        where a.ROWNMBR = @ROW
        execute sp_executesql @String
        set @ROW = @ROW + 1
    end 
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Select @pk = @pk + 1 would be better: SET @pk += @pk. Avoid using SELECT if you are not referencing tables are are just assigning values.

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