Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

As part of a basic presentation on unity i have created the following console application (kinda lengthy):

IUnityContainer container = new UnityContainer();
        container.RegisterType<ISimpleClass, SimpleClass>();
        container.RegisterType<ISingletonWithUnity, SingletonWithUnity>(new ContainerControlledLifetimeManager());

        double N = 10000;
        double sum = 0;

        Console.WriteLine("Testing performace of a basic new object");
        for (int i = 0; i < N; i++)
        {
            DateTime start = DateTime.Now;
            ISimpleClass simpleClass = new SimpleClass();
            DateTime end = DateTime.Now;
            sum += (end - start).Milliseconds;
        }
        double average = sum/N;
        Console.WriteLine("Average time for basic new object is: " + average);


        Console.WriteLine("Testing performance of transient resolve using unity");
        sum = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < N; i++)
        {
            DateTime start = DateTime.Now;
            ISimpleClass simpleClass = container.Resolve<SimpleClass>();
            DateTime end = DateTime.Now;
            sum += (end - start).Milliseconds;
        }
        average = sum / N;

        Console.WriteLine("Average time for transient resolve using unity is: " + average);


        Console.WriteLine("Testing performance of basic singleton");
        sum = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < N; i++)
        {
            DateTime start = DateTime.Now;
            BasicSingltonClass basicSingltonClass = BasicSingltonClass.Instance;
            DateTime end = DateTime.Now;
            sum += (end - start).Milliseconds;
        }
        average = sum / N;

        Console.WriteLine("Average time for basic singleton is: " + average);

        Console.WriteLine("Testing performance of unity singleton");
        sum = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < N; i++)
        {
            DateTime start = DateTime.Now;
            SingletonWithUnity singletonWithUnity = container.Resolve<SingletonWithUnity>();
            DateTime end = DateTime.Now;
            sum += (end - start).Milliseconds;
        }
        average = sum / N;

        Console.WriteLine("Average time for unity singleton is: " + average);

The classes used in the test are pretty straight forward:

  • SimpleClass is just an empty class
  • BasicSingletonClass is exactly what it is using the usual Double Checked Locking on the instance getter.
  • SingletonWithUnity is also just an empty class but as you can see it is registered with the ContainerControlleredLifetimeManager.

The results i'm getting as N goes higher (up to 1 million) are showing that using unity is actually much slower then not using it. I used to think that Unity had some sort of caching of resolves and such to make it much more faster, especially in transient resolve.

Here's an example of a result of running the performance test application when N is set to 10,000:

Testing performace of a basic new object Average time for basic new object is: 0.0007

Testing performance of transient resolve using unity Average time for transient resolve using unity is: 0.008

Testing performance of basic singleton Average time for basic singleton is: 0.0012

Testing performance of unity singleton Average time for unity singleton is: 0.0033

Press any key to continue . . .

As you can see using Unity is a performance impact. I would like to get your honest opinions on whats going on behind the scenes to explain these results.

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question

Keep in mind that Unity must locate the appropriate concrete class for the interface, and then if its found, construct it. Even cacheing the resolve doesn't change the fact that there's an extra method call and (possibly cached) look-up over just newing up the object yourself.

Unity isn't really intended to increase object creation performance. It's intended to provide a robust DI container that can help reduce coupling and ease testing of your code.

share|improve this answer
1  
I did not think that it was intended to increase object creation. But i was very surprised by the magnitude of these results, hence i'm looking for an explanation as to why these results are happening – JarJarrr Jun 1 '11 at 7:46
4  
Fair enough. I guess I can't answer about the specific magnitude differences (though I think the extra level of indirection is responsible.) You might want to try using Stopwatch rather than differences in DateTime.Now, since the resolution will be much higher. – dlev Jun 1 '11 at 7:51

Maybe it's interesting to give a theoretical explanation, but in practice this will never be a problem. I can hardly imagine that resolving your classes is the bottleneck in your program. You should only improve performance when it's necessary, not beforehand!

share|improve this answer
    
Unity resolution is causing a 9s bottleneck in our app from 36 calls to resolve. I assume the person is asking as he has a similar problem and is trying to work out what to do with it. Like me. – THEMike Sep 20 '12 at 10:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.