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I'm trying to work on a sub-class of System.Web.UI.WebControls.HyperLink in C# and I want to be able to specify a default text property that will replace the text value in certain conditions.

public class MyHyperLink : HyperLink
{
    public string DefaultText { get; set; }

    public override string Text
    {
        get
        {
            return string.IsNullOrEmpty(base.Text)
                ? (this.DefaultText ?? string.Empty)
                : base.Text;
        }
    }
}

When I used this code my hyperlink rendered on the page but instead of <a>Default Text</a> I got <a text="Default Text"></a>.

share|improve this question
    
Is it supposed to gets rendered like <a>Default Text</a> ?? –  Akram Shahda Jun 1 '11 at 8:09
    
And what is your problem with the following <a text="Default Text"></a> ?? –  Akram Shahda Jun 1 '11 at 8:10
    
Yes, the HyperLink.Text property is generally the property that determines what is displayed inside of the tags, but when I override it, instead of determining the text inside, it simply adds it to the set of properties that are rendered as attributes. –  Kyle Jun 1 '11 at 8:11
    
I thought that, in server controls, the second form is the default .. However, It might not be .. –  Akram Shahda Jun 1 '11 at 8:13
    
No, the Text property of a HyperLink has the special meaning of the text element nested inside of the tags. I don't know why it works on the standard class but won't work when it comes time to override it. –  Kyle Jun 1 '11 at 8:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

According to reflector, you did miss an attribute, and did not override the setter

public class MyHyperLink : HyperLink
{
    public string DefaultText { get; set; }

    [PersistenceMode(PersistenceMode.InnerDefaultProperty)]
    public override string Text
    {
        get
        {
            return string.IsNullOrEmpty(base.Text) ? this.DefaultText : base.Text;
        }
        set
        {
            base.Text = value;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I appreciate how you stuck to the original design. –  Kyle Jun 1 '11 at 8:27
    
Turns out the attribute is optional, but the setter is not, thank you for your help! –  Kyle Jun 1 '11 at 15:42

you don't need to override the Text property. You just need add a new string property and decorate that with the attribute PersistenceMode as showed below:

[PersistenceMode(PersistenceMode.InnerDefaultProperty)]
public string MyTextProperty{
    get
    {
       return ViewState["Text"] != null ? (string)ViewState["Text"] : string.Empty;
    }
    set
    {
        this.ViewState["Text"] = value;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You're completely overriding the behaviour of the Text property though so it may well not render how it was designed to. What you really want to do is override the Render method:

protected override void Render(HtmlTextWriter writer)
{
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(base.Text))
    {
        Text = (this.DefaultText ?? string.Empty);
    }
    base.Render(writer);
}

This is cutting in just before the control renders to change the Text around. It is happening so late in the control lifecycle it isn't even going to be saved in ViewState to save bloating!

share|improve this answer
    
I can definitely see the merit of this approach, but I do wish I could figure out why the original setup didn't work. –  Kyle Jun 1 '11 at 8:18
    
it didn't work because you need to make the persistence mode set to innerdefaultproperty. You are also missing a setter and various other bits. If you reflect on the HyperLink control you'll see how much of MS's code you've overridden :) –  BritishDeveloper Jun 1 '11 at 8:22

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