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It's weird that this is the first time I've bumped into this problem, but:

How do you define a constructor in a C# interface?

Edit
Some people wanted an example (it's a free time project, so yes, it's a game)

IDrawable
+Update
+Draw

To be able to Update (check for edge of screen etc) and draw itself it will always need a GraphicsDeviceManager. So I want to make sure the object has a reference to it. This would belong in the constructor.

Now that I wrote this down I think what I'm implementing here is IObservable and the GraphicsDeviceManager should take the IDrawable... It seems either I don't get the XNA framework, or the framework is not thought out very well.

Edit
There seems to be some confusion about my definition of constructor in the context of an interface. An interface can indeed not be instantiated so doesn't need a constructor. What I wanted to define was a signature to a constructor. Exactly like an interface can define a signature of a certain method, the interface could define the signature of a constructor.

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11 Answers 11

up vote 208 down vote accepted

You can't. It's occasionally a pain, but you wouldn't be able to call it using normal techniques anyway.

In a blog post I've suggested static interfaces which would only be usable in generic type constraints - but could be really handy, IMO.

One point about if you could define a constructor within an interface, you'd have trouble deriving classes:

public class Foo : IParameterlessConstructor
{
    public Foo() // As per the interface
    {
    }
}

public class Bar : Foo
{
    // Yikes! We now don't have a parameterless constructor...
    public Bar(int x)
    {
    }
}
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3  
I could see problems indeed, but the same goes for all other methods you define. Usually NotSupportedException is the only way out. –  Boris Callens Mar 6 '09 at 18:25
4  
@boris: The difference is that there's always something to be called with normal inheritance, guaranteed by the compiler. In this case there's something which "ought" to be there but isn't. –  Jon Skeet Mar 6 '09 at 19:01
16  
Yeah but what's wrong with that, there's no suitable Bar constructor because it doesn't satisfy the interface properly. That'd be like saying you can't define methods in interfaces because if you don't implement it, it won't work. –  jsimmons Aug 8 '10 at 6:21
8  
@Gravitas: Useful or not, it's certainly not available today. I suspect if this feature were ever to show up, it would require rather more careful design than we can do in comments :) –  Jon Skeet Oct 5 '11 at 9:29
4  
@user1721649: There are plenty of places where I've wanted this - almost always with generic constraints. Basically, you want to be able to call a constructor within a generic method, to create an instance of the generic type implementing some interface. It really would be useful. –  Jon Skeet Jan 8 '13 at 19:45

A very late contribution demonstrating another problem with interfaced constructors. (I choose this question because it has the clearest articulation of the problem). Suppose we could have:

interface IPerson
{
    IPerson(string name);
}

interface ICustomer
{
    ICustomer(DateTime registrationDate);
}

class Person : IPerson, ICustomer
{
    Person(string name) { }
    Person(DateTime registrationDate) { }
}

Where by convention the implementation of the "interface constructor" is replaced by the type name.

Now make an instance:

ICustomer a = new Person("Ernie");

Would we say that the contract ICustomer is obeyed?

And what about this:

interface ICustomer
{
    ICustomer(string address);
}
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2  
if you have a method by the same signature and name in ICustomer and IPerson, this problem is there also. I do not see how this helps. Interfaces are not for "only my definition". It is for "include me at any cost" –  nawfal Oct 9 '12 at 6:08
2  
@nawfal The point is that an interface never demands that a method is executed, only that it should exist. It can never guarantee state. Contrary, a "constructor interface" does demand that something be done (executed) when an object is constructed. This can never be guaranteed when there are different interfaces. –  Gert Arnold Oct 9 '12 at 6:59
2  
@GertArnold a method does its job, while a constructor does its. I do not know understand what is the difference here. Interfaces make a contract that "my implementation should be there", not like "mine should be the only implementation". I would say for consistency, this should be valid for constructors, methods, properties –  nawfal Oct 9 '12 at 7:44
2  
I don't see how this is a problem, one could simply make a rule that only allows chaining interfaces with identical constructor signatures. It would be the same behavior as if interface A implements "foo : int" and interface B implements "foo : string", they are just not compatible. –  Toodleey Apr 12 '13 at 10:34
1  
It reminds me of c++ multiple inheritence problem without virtual inheritance –  prabhakaran Mar 4 at 5:47

You can't.

Interfaces define contracts that other objects implement and therefore have no state that needs to be initialized.

If you have some state that needs to be initialized, you should consider using an abstract base class instead.

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7  
Why cant a contract have a state? –  Sandeep Datta Sep 21 '11 at 12:40
7  
Because the contract binds you to provide a certain behaviour. How interfaces are used implies extracting common behaviours, and that is not dependent on state (which would then be an implementation detail). –  Cornelius Nov 15 '12 at 13:58

It is not possible to create an interface that defines constructors, but it is possible to define an interface that forces a type to have a paramerterless constructor, though be it a very ugly syntax that uses generics... I am actually not so sure that it is really a good coding pattern.

public interface IFoo<T> where T : new()
{
  void SomeMethod();
}

public class Foo : IFoo<Foo>
{
  // This will not compile
  public Foo(int x)
  {

  }

  #region ITest<Test> Members

  public void SomeMethod()
  {
    throw new NotImplementedException();
  }

  #endregion
}

On the other hand, if you want to test if a type has a paramerterless constructor, you can do that using reflection:

public static class TypeHelper
{
  public static bool HasParameterlessConstructor(Object o)
  {
    return HasParameterlessConstructor(o.GetType());
  }

  public static bool HasParameterlessConstructor(Type t)
  {
    // Usage: HasParameterlessConstructor(typeof(SomeType))
    return t.GetConstructor(new Type[0]) != null;
  }
}

Hope this helps.

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1  
I would use the interface constructor to make sure some arguments are defenatly set (through the constructor) so a parameterless ctor is not really what I'm looking for. –  Boris Callens Mar 6 '09 at 18:44

I was looking back at this question and I thought to myself, maybe we are aproaching this problem the wrong way. Interfaces might not be the way to go when it concerns defining a constructor with certain parameters... but an (abstract) base class is.

If you create a base class with a constructor on there that accepts the parameters you need, every class that derrives from it needs to supply them.

public abstract class Foo
{
  protected Foo(SomeParameter x)
  {
    this.X = x;
  }

  public SomeParameter X { get; private set }
}

public class Bar : Foo // Bar inherits from Foo
{
  public Bar() 
    : base(new SomeParameter("etc...")) // Bar will need to supply the constructor param
  {
  }
}
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This is how I solved this issue as well. My interface defines what the class needs to be able to do, but my base abstract class enforces the constructor component of it. –  Bill Sambrone May 14 at 20:45

The generic factory approach still seems ideal. You would know that the factory requires a parameter, and it would just so happen that those parameters are passed along to the constructor of the object being instantiated.

Note, this is just syntax verified pseudo code, there may be a run-time caveat I'm missing here:

public interface IDrawableFactory
{
    TDrawable GetDrawingObject<TDrawable>(GraphicsDeviceManager graphicsDeviceManager) 
              where TDrawable: class, IDrawable, new();
}

public class DrawableFactory : IDrawableFactory
{
    public TDrawable GetDrawingObject<TDrawable>(GraphicsDeviceManager graphicsDeviceManager) 
                     where TDrawable : class, IDrawable, new()
    {
        return (TDrawable) Activator
                .CreateInstance(typeof(TDrawable), 
                                graphicsDeviceManager);
    }

}

public class Draw : IDrawable
{
 //stub
}

public class Update : IDrawable {
    private readonly GraphicsDeviceManager _graphicsDeviceManager;

    public Update() { throw new NotImplementedException(); }

    public Update(GraphicsDeviceManager graphicsDeviceManager)
    {
        _graphicsDeviceManager = graphicsDeviceManager;
    }
}

public interface IDrawable
{
    //stub
}
public class GraphicsDeviceManager
{
    //stub
}

An example of possible usage:

    public void DoSomething()
    {
        var myUpdateObject = GetDrawingObject<Update>(new GraphicsDeviceManager());
        var myDrawObject = GetDrawingObject<Draw>(null);
    }

Granted, you'd only want the create instances via the factory to guarantee you always have an appropriately initialized object. Perhaps using a dependency injection framework like AutoFac would make sense; Update() could "ask" the IoC container for a new GraphicsDeviceManager object.

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It looks like you can leave the constraints on the interface, but there is no way for the compiler to know that the factory is going to return something the implements it, so just implicitly implement IDrawableFactory public TDrawable GetDrawingObject<TDrawable>(GraphicsDeviceManager graphicsDeviceManager) –  Matthew Jun 28 '12 at 21:30
    
Hahah I wrote my response before noticing yours Matt, looks like we think alike but I think you should use the generic on the interface itself with the where clause to lock the type –  JTtheGeek Jun 29 '12 at 3:49
    
@JTtheGeek - I think I understand partially, but it seems to me it would make my factory too rigid, more like overriding an abstract base class. I would have to instantiate a completely new factory object to get at the underlying types, right? This is why I only put the constraints on the builder method, but I may be missing the mark. Perhaps you could post an example of what you'd change to help me see it more clearly. Needing to pass null to create a Draw object to satisfy the parameter requirements even though Draw may have an empty, default ctor is definitely a drawback to my approach. –  Matthew Jun 29 '12 at 15:11

One way to solve this problem i found is to seperate out the construction into a seperate factory. For example I have an abstract class called IQueueItem, and I need a way to translate that object to and from another object (CloudQueueMessage). So on the interface IQueueItem i have -

public interface IQueueItem
{
    CloudQueueMessage ToMessage();
}

Now, I also need a way for my actual queue class to translate a CloudQueueMessage back to a IQueueItem - ie the need for a static construction like IQueueItem objMessage = ItemType.FromMessage. Instead I defined another interface IQueueFactory -

public interface IQueueItemFactory<T> where T : IQueueItem
{
    T FromMessage(CloudQueueMessage objMessage);
}

Now I can finally write my generic queue class without the new() constraint which in my case was the main issue.

public class AzureQueue<T> where T : IQueueItem
{
    private IQueueItemFactory<T> _objFactory;
    public AzureQueue(IQueueItemFactory<T> objItemFactory)
    {
        _objFactory = objItemFactory;
    }


    public T GetNextItem(TimeSpan tsLease)
    {
        CloudQueueMessage objQueueMessage = _objQueue.GetMessage(tsLease);
        T objItem = _objFactory.FromMessage(objQueueMessage);
        return objItem;
    }
}

now I can create an instance that satisfies the criteria for me

 AzureQueue<Job> objJobQueue = new JobQueue(new JobItemFactory())

hopefully this helps someone else out someday, obviously a lot of internal code removed to try to show the problem and solution

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you don't.

the constructor is part of the class that can implement an interface. The interface is just a contract of methods the class must implement.

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12  
Yes and the contract would specify that the implementor needs a ctor that complies to this specific signature. –  Boris Callens Mar 6 '09 at 18:46

You could do this with generics trick, but it still is vulnerable to what Jon Skeet wrote:

public interface IHasDefaultConstructor<T> where T : IHasDefaultConstructor<T>, new()
{
}

Class that implements this interface must have parameterless constructor:

public class A : IHasDefaultConstructor<A> //Notice A as generic parameter
{
    public A(int a) { } //compile time error
}
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It would be very useful if it were possible to define constructors in interfaces.

Given that an interface is a contract that must be used in the specified way. The following approach might be a viable alternative for some scenarios:

public interface IFoo {

    /// <summary>
    /// Initialize foo.
    /// </summary>
    /// <remarks>
    /// Classes that implement this interface must invoke this method from
    /// each of their constructors.
    /// </remarks>
    /// <exception cref="InvalidOperationException">
    /// Thrown when instance has already been initialized.
    /// </exception>
    void Initialize(int a);

}

public class ConcreteFoo : IFoo {

    private bool _init = false;

    public int b;

    // Obviously in this case a default value could be used for the
    // constructor argument; using overloads for purpose of example

    public ConcreteFoo() {
        Initialize(42);
    }

    public ConcreteFoo(int a) {
        Initialize(a);
    }

    public void Initialize(int a) {
        if (_init)
            throw new InvalidOperationException();
        _init = true;

        b = a;
    }

}
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The problem with that is that it doesn't allow me to know that I can pass a variable to the constructor of this new item. –  Boris Callens May 18 '12 at 7:54
    
@Boris Are you instantiating objects using reflection? –  Lea Hayes May 19 '12 at 13:46

One way to force some sort of constructor is to declare only Getters in interface, which could then mean that the implementing class must have a method, ideally a constructor, to have the value set (privately) for it.

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