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I tried to build a minimal example:

struct Functor
{
    void operator()(int& a)
    {
        a += 1;
    }
    void other(int& a)
    {
        a += 2;
    }
};

template <typename foo>
class Class
{
    public:
        void function()
        {
            int a = 10;
            foo()(a);
            std::cout << a << std::endl;
        }
};

int main()
{
    Class<Functor> c;
    c.function();
}

My question about this: Why is it even possible to call the operator on the pure type without an object? How can I call the function other the same way as I call operator()?

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Where's the "pure type"? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 1 '11 at 9:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You're not calling it on a pure type. foo() invokes the constructor, and evaluates to a temporary foo object, on which you then invoke operator().

To do the equivalent with a "normal" member function, just do:

foo().other(a);
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That means for every call there will be an object allocated on the stack? –  DyingSoul Jun 1 '11 at 9:09
    
@DyingSoul: If you do it like this, then yes! Although the compiler is free to optimise that however it likes. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 1 '11 at 9:10
4  
@DyingSoul: yes and no, since your structure is empty, and since the methods are inline, it is likely that the compiler will simply execute the code within the method "in place" (equivalent to replacing foo()(a) with a += 1. If your method is not inline (for whatever reason), then it will have to reserve a byte (at least) on the stack, because a valid address needs to be passed to the method (the this) and it cannot know you do not need it, in fact. –  Matthieu M. Jun 1 '11 at 9:33

You are not "call[ing] the operator on the pure type without an object". The syntax foo()(a) is creating a temporary of type foo (this is the foo() part) and then calling operator() on that object with a as argument: (the (a) part).

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Pure type example:

struct Functor
{
    void operator()(int& a)
    {
        a += 1;
    }
    void other(int& a)
    {
        a += 2;
    }
    static void one_more(int& a)
    {
        a += 3;
    }
};

template <typename foo>
class Class
{
    public:
        void function()
        {
            int a = 10;
            foo()(a);
            foo().other(a);
            foo::one_more(a);
            std::cout << a << std::endl;
        }
};

int main()
{
    Class<Functor> c;
    c.function();
}
share|improve this answer
    
To call the static function is more efficient because we dont need to create an instance on the stack, right? –  DyingSoul Jun 1 '11 at 9:21
    
And the compiler can inline the static funtion because it will be resolved at compile time? –  DyingSoul Jun 1 '11 at 9:21
3  
@DyingSoul: In this scenario, all three will probably be turned into identical machine code. The constructor has no observable side effects, so the compiler can optimise it away entirely. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 1 '11 at 9:27

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