Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am drawing an image in HTML 5 using canvas in JavaScript. I need to draw it at a rotated angle. I know this can be done by applying rotate(angle) function using the context of the canvas. But I need to do this without rotating the canvas itself.

Kindly suggest possible approach for this if it's possible.

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can actually draw whatever you want to rotate into an offscreen canvas and draw that into your main canvas. I borrowed this code from a Google IO Talk:

rotateAndCache = function(image,angle) {
  var offscreenCanvas = document.createElement('canvas');
  var offscreenCtx = offscreenCanvas.getContext('2d');

  var size = Math.max(image.width, image.height);
  offscreenCanvas.width = size;
  offscreenCanvas.height = size;

  offscreenCtx.translate(size/2, size/2);
  offscreenCtx.rotate(angle + Math.PI/2);
  offscreenCtx.drawImage(image, -(image.width/2), -(image.height/2));

  return offscreenCanvas;
}

then cache it with:

rotobj = rotateAndCache(myimg,myangle)

and in your drawcode:

mycontext.drawImage(rotobj,x_coord,y_coord)

This is only useful if you have an object that is rotated by an angle only once and is subsequently only subject to transformations.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks PeterT. That almost fits the bill what I was looking for. Thanks again. – Vinayak Jun 3 '11 at 6:40
    
Any chance you have the link to that talk? – Alexander Jun 11 '11 at 3:49
1  
@Alexander actually I do: google.com/events/io/2011/sessions/… the Video is at youtube.com/watch?v=yEocRtn_j9s – PeterT Jun 12 '11 at 0:44
    
Is there a similar way to scale the image? – Kantesh Jul 1 '11 at 9:23
1  
@AinTohvri nope, the '+' was correct, it's just there to adjust the angle of 0 pointing right instead of up. Which is useful generally and in this case done because it allows for easier alignment toward the mouse cursor (taking the direct result of atan2). – PeterT Jan 15 '14 at 5:57

When you apply transformation on canvas you don't rotate canvas. you just tell that all you.are going to draw will be transformed in particular way. If you want to avoid transformation to affect other commands use save() and restore() methods. They allow to save and restore settings of the canvas.

ctx.save();
ctx.rotate(30);
ctx.drawImage();
ctx.restore();
share|improve this answer
    
Is there a similar way to scale the image? – Kantesh Jul 1 '11 at 9:21
    
Yes, scale instead of rotate. And two parameters, horizontal and vertical scaling factors. – bjornd Jul 1 '11 at 9:42

I've upvoted @PeterT-- great snippet and works well-- thanks for that! I did have to make 3 small changes to get this to work for me:

1. the max of width and height isn't enough: if you think about rotating a square, you need a circle whose diameter is the diagonal of the square (var diam).
2. the canvas needs to be translated back (or use save/restore).
3. the object x and y coordinates have to be adjusted for the canvas size.

So I ended up with:

    rotateAndCache = function(image,angle) {
        var offscreenCanvas = document.createElement('canvas');
        var offscreenCtx = offscreenCanvas.getContext('2d');

        var size = Math.max(image.width, image.height);
        var diam = 2*((size/2)*Math.sqrt(2));                 // needs to be saved
        offscreenCanvas.width = diam;
        offscreenCanvas.height = diam;

        offscreenCtx.translate(diam/2, diam/2);
        offscreenCtx.rotate(angle);
        offscreenCtx.drawImage(image, -(image.width/2), -(image.height/2));
        offscreenCtx.translate(-diam/2, -diam/2);

        return offscreenCanvas;
}


And the adjusted draw position (needs to be saved in rotateAndCache):
mycontext.drawImage(rotobj,x-(diam-width)/2,y-(diam-height)/2);

share|improve this answer
    
if you want to be precise you need a circle with a diameter that is equivalent to the diagonal of the rectangle, so it'd be var diam = Math.sqrt(image.width*image.width + image.height * image.height); but yeah, I get your point. – PeterT Oct 17 '14 at 22:50
    
Yeah, largest dimension is confusing, I meant diagonal. The code should do that (it's a 1-1-radical 2 right triangle) – dhc Oct 17 '14 at 22:54
    
But that's the diagonal of a square with a length of max(image.width, image.height) on all sides is it not ? Which may or may not be slightly larger than the one of a rectangle with unequal side-lengths (at least it's not smaller, so it won't cause errors). – PeterT Oct 17 '14 at 22:56
    
Got it... yes, your diam correction would save canvas memory... – dhc Oct 17 '14 at 23:10

That's not possible and you probably don't need it. Try this:

context.save() // Save current state (includes transformations)
context.rotate()
... draw image ...
context.restore() // Restore state
share|improve this answer
    
Is there a similar way to scale the image? – Kantesh Jul 1 '11 at 9:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.