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I'm totally new to vim and I know what magical things vim can do. My requirement is to append a sequence of numbers at the end of each line and I saw somebody did that before in front of me. It's just that I don't have enough time to search for the correct command, so I think post a question here should be a faster way since I'm running out of time. Sorry for being a noob but seems this is the only way I can come up with.

So the sample file content is like

1       Afghanistan     
2       Albania 
3       Algeria 
4       American        
5       Andorra 
6       Angola  
7       Anguilla        
8       Antarctica

a list of countries, imagine it is a database table and each column is separated with tab. I already figured out a way to append tab to the end of each line, but now the problem is to add a number at the end of each line as well, and the number for each line is exactly same with its id(the first number)

I somehow think that it should be done with visual mode, but please tell me a working solution if you know. Any help is highly appreciated.

Best Regards, Hai Lang

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1  
Your example has 3 countries on one line. Did you forget some line breaks? –  Tudorizer Jun 1 '11 at 9:23

3 Answers 3

Input:

1       Afghanistan     
2       Albania 
3       Algeria 
4       American        
5       Andorra 
6       Angola  
7       Anguilla        
8       Antarctica

Keystrokes:

:%s!^\(\d\+\).*!&\t\1<CR>

Output:

1       Afghanistan         1
2       Albania     2
3       Algeria     3
4       American            4
5       Andorra     5
6       Angola      6
7       Anguilla            7
8       Antarctica  8

Par : 20

Explanation:

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1  
+1 for breakdown. May I suggest using the simpler \t escape rather than the un-SO-friendly <C-v><C-i> which will also not work for Win32 users out of the box? –  sehe Jun 1 '11 at 10:00
1  
Thanks, this works as well. And especial thanks to your explanation. –  bestwc Jun 1 '11 at 10:04
    
@sehe: Thanks. Have updated answer with your suggestion (I'm not a Windows programmer). –  Johnsyweb Jun 1 '11 at 10:18
    
@bestwc: Very happy to help. –  Johnsyweb Jun 1 '11 at 10:19

You could use recordings, which are enabled by q followed by a letter, which is the bookmark for that recording.

E.g. In normal mode go to the first line and type:

qe
^
y<space>
$
p
q (to end the recording)

Now type @e to play the recording from letter e or 20@e, which repeats @e 20 times. You can play around with the recordings like this. Maybe also record a j, in normal mode so it takes you to the next line.

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Good suggestion, but ^ y $ p q does not do what the OP wants. –  Michael Foukarakis Jun 1 '11 at 9:35
1  
@Michael: i edited the formatting problems –  sehe Jun 1 '11 at 9:36
3  
To yank 1 character, yl. To yank the number, yiw. –  Michael Foukarakis Jun 1 '11 at 9:39

Open your file in vim. Press ESC if not in escape mode.

write this :%s/$/\=line('.')/

This will append the sequence of numbers at the end of each line. To add numbers in the begining do

:%s/^/\=line('.')/

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+1 Upvote for regex :) –  Tudorizer Jun 1 '11 at 9:31
1  
This did the trick. Thanks very much and it will be even greater if you explain this command a little bit. –  bestwc Jun 1 '11 at 9:46
1  
This does not actually copy the number, it just appends the vim-buffer's line number to the line –  sehe Jun 1 '11 at 10:01
1  
:%s/a/b <= Means replace pattern a with b at every line. % is to specify everyline. :%s/a/b/g <= Everyline everyplace wherever a is there replace with b. Now in :%s/$/\=line('.')/ a is $ and b is =line('.') . $ means end of line and ^ means start of line. They are not start and end characters of the line. They actually are something just before starting character and just after last character (before newline) respectively –  Mayank Jun 1 '11 at 10:38
    
You can have a look here –  Mayank Jun 1 '11 at 10:40

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