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Is there a link hidden somewhere in the documentation which I have been missing?

(Or is there a reason why Oracle makes it that hard to see the source?)

Edit: Thanks for all the kind suggestions for alternatives, but I know that I can download the whole source zip, start an IDE etc.

The question is really about how to do it with about various extra-steps in between and without leaving the browser.

Examples where this seems to work:

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1  
Do you want to know how to get it in an IDE or strengthen your Google-Foo? –  Waldheinz Jun 1 '11 at 10:17
    
My question wasn't clear enough, I added some explanation. –  soc Jun 1 '11 at 12:04
    
how to do it with about various extra-steps in between and without leaving the browser ? What does that mean ? –  sgokhales Jun 1 '11 at 15:59
    
That I neither want to change from the webbroser to an IDE just to lookup some implementation or use search engines, where I have no guarantee what results I will get. –  soc Jun 2 '11 at 16:14

6 Answers 6

A very nice resource for browsing library code without having to import all the source jars in your IDE is DocJar

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Is there a link hidden somewhere in the documentation which I have been missing?

No.

Even searching on Google doesn't really turn up with reliable/usable results ...

I often manage to find the Oracle / Sun classes by doing a Google phrase search for the FQN with .java.html appended to it; e.g. "java.io.Reader.java.html" where the quotes are part of the search term.

Alternatively, your IDE can typically show you the source code of the SE classes, or you can search for them by hand in the sources ZIP file in your JDK installation.

(Or is there a reason why Oracle makes it that hard to see the source?)

Probably lawyers.

It might also unwillingness to resource the hardware / network bandwidth for a server to host the files. (With some justification ... given that there are alternatives.)

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Use Ctrl+click by placing the cursor on the class name you want to see in Java Doc.

Follow the steps shown here for including the zip file of JavaDoc in Eclipse IDE : Eclipse FAQ

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Reason for downvote ? –  sgokhales Jun 1 '11 at 15:58

In principle, the idea is that you should be able to use the Java API without knowing the implementation, only reading the API documentation. This is probably the reason the documentation does not include the optional source listings (which javadoc can generate).

Said this, the JDK download (and the installation) includes a file named src.zip which includes most of the Java source code for the standard API – I'm normally using this if I need to know the source.

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Thanks, but I knew that. I just wonder if there is a hassle-free way instead of downloading the whole standard library to view one source file, start hunting it on the internet or starting an IDE. –  soc Jun 1 '11 at 14:59
up vote 0 down vote accepted

It is not possible.

The JavaDoc tool seems to provide some setting for linking to the source, but Oracle doesn't activate that option.

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Maybe my answer is overly naive, but for a NetBeans user it's as simple as CTRL+SHIFT+B (while the cursor is on the class you're interested in). After reading the Eclipse related answer I found out that CTRL + Click works in NetBeans, too.

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