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In following code I purposefully mistype "@fooData" to "@foo111Data" to check if the try statement is catching my exception. See below code. But the try/catch statement did not catch and display and exception in MessageBox, and VS2010 just break down and highlight the line of wrong code.

try
{
    conn.Open();
    cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@foo111Data", dataStrTb1.Text);
    cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
}
catch (SqlCeException ex)
{
    MessageBox.Show(ex.ToString());
}
finally
{
    conn.Close();
}
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1  
What type is the exception thrown? –  CharlesB Jun 1 '11 at 10:12
    
I think you are running in debug mode, I think this will work fine in relese mode. –  Abdul Muqtadir Jun 1 '11 at 10:13
2  
Are you positive that SqlCeException (or any) exception should be thrown? You might try with System.Exception instead. –  ipavlic Jun 1 '11 at 10:14

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Perhaps an exception of a different type is being thrown? I would suggest that you change the catch so that it just catches a general Exception, and see if it's throwing another type.

Put a breakpoint in the catch statement, on the MessageBox.Show line, and then you can examine the Exception.

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Try catching a SqlException

catch (SqlException ex)
{
    MessageBox.Show(ex.ToString());
}
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instead of SqlCeException try to catch all Exceptions and see how it works.

I would actually use a logger and not simply the messagebox like you are doing now.

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Try

try 
{     
conn.Open();     
cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@foo111Data", `dataStrTb1.Text);     
cmd.ExecuteNonQuery(); 
} 
catch (SqlException ex) 
{     
MessageBox.Show(ex.ToString()); 
}
catch (Exception ex) 
{     
MessageBox.Show(ex.ToString()); 
} 

finally 
{     
conn.Close(); 
}` 
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if really had to write another example I would have also used the Using block around the connection and traced ex.Message instead of ex.ToString()... :) –  Davide Piras Jun 1 '11 at 10:18
    
My idea was to catch Exception so that no exception gets uncatched. Sorry if you mind that :) –  Abdul Muqtadir Jun 1 '11 at 10:19

There is a feature in Visual Studio which enables you to stop if an exception is thrown, even if it gets catched.

Simply click on the menuitem Debugging, then on Exceptions, then on column "thrown" and unmark certain exceptions you do not want to cause the debugger automatically to break.

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