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Here is a short part of my data:

dat <-structure(list(sex = structure(c(1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 
1L, 1L, 1L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L), .Label = c("male", 
"female"), class = "factor"), A = c(1, 2, 0, 2, 1, 2, 2, 0, 2, 
0, 1, 2, 2, 0, 0, 2, 0, 0, 0, 2), B = c(0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 2, 0, 
0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0), C = c(1, 2, 1, 0, 0, 
2, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 2, 1, 2, 0, 2, 1, 2), D = c(2, 2, 0, 
2, 2, 2, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 2, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0), E = c(0, 
0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 2, 0, 0, 0, 1, 2, 2), F = c(2, 
2, 1, 2, 1, 2, 2, 0, 1, 2, 0, 1, 2, 2, 0, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2)), .Names = c("sex", 
"A", "B", "C", "D", "E", "F"), variable.labels = structure(c("sex", 
"zenuwac", "panieke", "gespann", "rustelo", "angstig", "onzeker"
), .Names = c("sex", "anx01", "anx02", "anx03", "anx04", "anx05", 
"anx06")), codepage = 20127L, row.names = c(NA, 20L), class = "data.frame")

A data frame with scores of males and females on six 3-point variables. Now I want to create a plot which shows the histograms of the scores of each variable of both males and females in a grid. For example, I can do:

layout(matrix(1:12,6,2,byrow=TRUE))
par(mar=c(2,1,2,1))
for (i in 1:6) for (s in c("male","female")) hist(dat[dat$sex==s,i+1],main=paste("item",names(dat)[i+1],s))

which results in:

Histogram with base R graphics

I could make this look better but I am more interested in learning how to use ggplot2. So my question is, how do I create a pretty version of this using ggplot2? One thing I got working is:

library("ggplot2")
grid.newpage()
pushViewport(viewport(layout = grid.layout(6, 2)))   
for (s in 1:2)
{
    for (i in 1:6)
    {
        p <- qplot(dat[dat$sex==c("male","female")[s],i+1]+0.5, geom="histogram", binwidth=1)
        print(p, vp = viewport(layout.pos.row = i, layout.pos.col = s))
    }
}

But I guess there is a much easier way to do this?

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2 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You can try grid.arrange() from the gridExtra package; i.e., store your plots in a list (say qplt), and use

do.call(grid.arrange, qplt)

Other ideas: use facetting within ggplot2 (sex*variable), by considering a data.frame (use melt).

As a sidenote, it would be better to use stacked barchart or Cleveland's dotplot for displaying items response frequencies, IMO. (I gave some ideas on CrossValidated.)


For the sake of completeness, here are some implementation ideas:

# simple barchart
ggplot(melt(dat), aes(x=as.factor(value), fill=as.factor(value))) + 
  geom_bar() + facet_grid (variable ~ sex) + xlab("") + coord_flip() + 
  scale_fill_discrete("Response")

enter image description here

my.df <- ddply(melt(dat), c("sex","variable"), summarize, 
               count=table(value))
my.df$resp <- gl(3, 1, length=nrow(my.df), labels=0:2)

# stacked barchart
ggplot(my.df, aes(x=variable, y=count, fill=resp)) + 
  geom_bar() + facet_wrap(~sex) + coord_flip()

enter image description here

# dotplot
ggplot(my.df, aes(x=count, y=resp, colour=sex)) + geom_point() + 
  facet_wrap(~ variable)

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for facetting and stacked barchart. –  Roman Luštrik Jun 1 '11 at 11:20
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To follow up on chl's example - here's how to duplicate your base graphic with ggplot. I would heed his advice in looking to dotplots as well:

library(ggplot2)
dat.m <- melt(dat, "sex") 

ggplot(dat.m, aes(value)) + 
  geom_bar(binwidth = 0.5) + 
  facet_grid(variable ~ sex)
share|improve this answer
    
(+1) Ok, I ended up with something like ggplot(subset(melt(dat), as.numeric(variable)==i), aes(x=as.factor(value))) + geom_bar() + facet_grid (. ~ sex) + xlab("") (within a for loop wrt. levels of variable). Converting value to a factor avoids the noisy x-units. –  chl Jun 1 '11 at 11:56
    
@chl - Good call on the converting value to factor. I wasn't sure if the OPs full dataset would have filled the awkward blanks in or not, but good trick to have up your sleeve regardless. –  Chase Jun 1 '11 at 12:02
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