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Please refer to my code below. When optimization in IAR MSP430 compiler is set high, I am having the following issue. Code works fine when optimization is low.

Issue: If the condition statement at (B) returns false, statement (A) is executed instead of statement (C).


int16_t cpu_flash_read_setting (void * setting, const uint8_t offset, const uint8_t num_of_bytes)
{
    int16_t returnable_status = PASS;
    uint16_t flash_copy_one_address =  FLASH_INFO_SEG_C_ADDR + offset;
    uint16_t flash_copy_two_address =  FLASH_INFO_SEG_D_ADDR + offset;
    if (0U == (num_of_bytes % sizeof(uint16_t))) 
    {
        uint16_t *setting_copy_one = (uint16_t *) flash_copy_one_address;
        uint16_t *setting_copy_two = (uint16_t *) flash_copy_two_address;  
        if (*setting_copy_one == *setting_copy_two)
        {
            setting = setting_copy_one;       
        }
        else
        {
(A)         returnable_status = FAIL;         
        }
    }
    else if (0U == (num_of_bytes % sizeof(uint8_t))) 
    {
        uint8_t *setting_copy_one = (uint8_t *) flash_copy_one_address;
        uint8_t *setting_copy_two = (uint8_t *) flash_copy_two_address;  
(B)     if (*setting_copy_one == *setting_copy_two)
        {
            setting = setting_copy_one;       
        }
        else
        {
(C)        returnable_status = FAIL;         
        }      
    }
    else
    {
        /* No Action */
    }
    return returnable_status;    
}
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2  
And why is this a problem? After all it's the same piece of code isn't it? –  jv42 Jun 1 '11 at 11:50
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

That looks entirely reasonable to me. When you have optimisation turned up high, the compiler can and usually will re-order statements wildly. Your two main clauses are identical apart from their typing - so it's entirely plausible for the compiler to merge the execution paths and have them differ only where it actually matters.

This is only a problem if the actual observable effect differs from what was intended.

In any event, optimised code is always difficult to follow with a debugger, precisely because of the re-ordering effects.

By the way, if your code is talking to actual hardware you may want to declare the flash_copy_*_address variables as volatile. This is a hint to the compiler that the memory they point to doesn't necessarily behave in the normal way, and forces it be more conservative with its optimisations.

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Thank you so much for your correct reply. As you said, since the optimized code is difficult to follow with a debugger, I will check for correct results during unit testing. Will make the flash_copy_*_address variables volatile. –  Ammamon Jun 1 '11 at 12:55
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The two lines of code A and C are identical, and the execution paths merge after those two lines (the next line to be executed in both cases is return returnable_status;.

Thus the compiler is performing tail-merging optimisation, using the same block of assembly code for both source code lines. This optimisation is expected and perfectly valid, and should not cause a problem.

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Thank you so much. –  Ammamon Jun 1 '11 at 12:57
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