Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Today i see code in which user is releasing the object first and then he is making that object nil. like this

[objectA release];
objectA=nil;

I have read at many books that we should make the object nil while leaving the view and release the object later(in dealloc method of course this method is called after viewWillDisappear or viewDidDisappear).

Now i want to know that which approach is better?

share|improve this question
add comment

6 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Setting to nil and releasing are two distinct operations.

You release an object to relinquish ownership of it. This is covered in the standard Memory Managemange Guidelines. If you are not familiar with them, you should read them before doing any further iOS programming.

After releasing an object, you should set it to nil if you know that some other code may attempt to access that variable later. This is most common with instance variables.

For example, you may use an instance variable to store some sort of cache:

- (NSArray *)items
{
    if (!cachedItems) {
        cachedItems = [[self calculateItems] retain];
    }

    return cachedItems;
}

Later on you may need to clear this cache:

- (void)invalidateCache
{
    [cachedItems release];
    cachedItems = nil;
}

We need to set cachedItems to nil because our items method may attempt to use it later. If we do not set it to nil, messages send to the (now released) cache can lead to a crash.

So set a variable to nil after releasing it when it can potentially be access by other methods in your class at a later point in time.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for the great explanation with context. –  Krishnan Jun 1 '11 at 13:30
    
what is your explanation for second scenario. nil the object first and then release it do it will be same effect as u explain already? –  Developer Jun 3 '11 at 5:45
    
It works because everywhere apart from the dealloc method you used self.object = nil. This uses the setter that (if declared correctly) will release the current value and then set the new value to nil. You don't do it this way in the dealloc because you are discouraged from using accessor methods in init and dealloc. –  Abizern Jun 3 '11 at 11:49
    
If you set the variable to nil first, then release, you have a memory leak. After setting the variable to nil, calling 'release' will do nothing. –  Mike Weller Jun 9 '11 at 10:55
add comment

I don't think is important set object to nil, but is good to do.

If you do :

  objectA = nil;
  [objectA release];

You have LOST the memory, and this is a memory leak. If you only do [objectA release], you will release the memory, but the objectA still point to the memory, so if you try to do things like:

  if (objectA==nil)

This will return FALSE, because objectA is NOT a nil. But because you do this almost in

  - (void)dealloc;

you don't need set it to nil in this function.

share|improve this answer
add comment

If the object is created locally:

I would go with the first approach, it's a common practice to release the object first then assign an nil.

I haven'nt read about your second approach in any book.

If the object is the part of class variable and have retain and @synthesize :

The below will do the both work (first release then assign nil through setter function) at once.

self.object = nil ;
share|improve this answer
add comment

First approach is the way to go for you..

[objectA release];
objectA=nil;

Also making object nil is a good practice (not if you are using it later) because after releasing the object, if I accidentally refers to it again your app will crash. But if you gave nil to the object, and you refer to it later it won't crash in objective C.(Situations similiar gave nullpointerException in languages like java)

ie

[objectA doneSomeTask];

wont crash,even if objectA is nil. As objective C silently ignores refering to nil.

share|improve this answer
    
There's some disagreement about whether to set variables to nil after release. If you expect an object to be valid, setting it to nil may hide bugs. Of course, if the bugs are so well hidden that nobody ever notices them, then why bother fixing them, right? –  kubi Jun 1 '11 at 13:32
    
Reference to the disagreement: red-sweater.com/blog/1423/dont-coddle-your-code –  kubi Jun 1 '11 at 13:33
    
I have heard about that disagreement @kubi..What I usually do is comment these statements where we set variables to nil during debug...Before release uncomment them..It is always good to set all possible ways to suppress bugs after release, when we dont have any control on the program running on users devices.. –  Krishnabhadra Jun 2 '11 at 2:52
add comment

What you have read in books does not work. If you set the object to nil you can not release it later because you can not excess the object then. You should to the first approach.

share|improve this answer
    
you are not correct U can check both will work. –  Developer Jun 1 '11 at 11:57
1  
In this case you will send the release-message to nil and this will do ... nothing but create a memory leak. See also answer from Rodrigo. –  dasdom Jun 1 '11 at 12:16
add comment

Best way:

[objectA release]; // sightly sightly faster since less function calls
objectA=nil;

Lazy way:

self.objectA=nil;

it will call:

(void)setObjectA:(ObjectAClass *)objectA
{
    [objectA release];         // <-- original value is released
    objectA = [objectA retain];// <-- set the point to nil and do nothing since nil
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.