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I have a List<List<T>>. How can I count all the elements in this as if it was a single List<T> in the fastest way?

So far I have used

List<int> result = listOfLists
  .SelectMany(list => list)
  .Distinct()
  .ToList().Count;

but this actually creates a list and then counts the element which is not a very good idea.

share|improve this question
    
The linq expression is from stackoverflow.com/questions/462879/… – kasperhj Jun 1 '11 at 12:17
    
the fastest way would probably be to not use linq and stick with a for loop – RichK Jun 1 '11 at 12:18
2  
No need for .ToList(), use Count() extension – Homam Jun 1 '11 at 12:24
up vote 13 down vote accepted

I would recommend a simple, nested loop with a HashSet if you need to eliminate duplicates between lists. It combines the SelectMany and Distinct operations into the set insertion logic and should be faster since the HashSet has O(1) lookup time. Internally Distinct() may actually use something similar, but this omits the construction of the single list entirely.

var set = new HashSet<T>();
foreach (var list in listOfLists)
{
    foreach (var item in list)
    {
        set.Add(item);
    }
}
var result = set.Count;
share|improve this answer
    
I think item in this code will be List<T> not an item – Homam Jun 1 '11 at 12:26
    
It should be a bit faster since some delegate calls get eliminated. Distinct already uses a HashSet with pretty much the same logic. And I don't see the you doing the SelectMany here. So your current code is quite different. – CodesInChaos Jun 1 '11 at 12:28
    
@Homam -- good catch, it should have been a nested loop. It's basically the same, except no need to construct a combined, internal list to do the distinct over. This saves memory and may improve the time. – tvanfosson Jun 1 '11 at 12:29
    
You can leave out the Contains. HashSet<T>.Add doesn't complain if the item already exists. – CodesInChaos Jun 1 '11 at 12:30
1  
@Shurdoof I'm pretty sure that's be slower. The point of this answer is that it's fast. For good readability one could use Homam's answer. – CodesInChaos Jun 1 '11 at 12:52

By using LINQ, I think your code is good with a bit changes that no need for .ToList(), just call Count() extension as the following:

int result = listOfLists.SelectMany(list => list).Distinct().Count();
share|improve this answer
1  
Most likely a bit slower that tvanfosson's answer. But it's still correct and shorter/easier to read. – CodesInChaos Jun 1 '11 at 12:39

To count all the elements in all the lists in the list, you could use the aggregating operators:

int count = listOfLists.Sum(l => l.Distinct().Count());
share|improve this answer
2  
This doesn't eliminate duplicates between lists, only within each list. – tvanfosson Jun 1 '11 at 12:26
2  
@lejon Why do you accept an answer that does something different from your original code? tvanfosson's and Homam's answers are the correct ones. – CodesInChaos Jun 1 '11 at 12:48

I'd like to get the chance to answer this question just to highlight when we should use linq and when a classic for. Unfortunately today people doesn’t care a lot about performance as we got use to work on very powerful computer. Anyway just try the code below and you will discover that Linq is more then 100 times slower than the classic for version. You should use Linq only when the expression you need to write is really complex and you want make it more readable. I didn't spend time to the solution shoed below as I'd like to focus on the performance

public static void Main(string [] arg)
{
    //create the list
    List<List<string>> listOfList = new List<List<string>>()
                                      {
                                          new List<string>()
                                              {
                                                  "1.1","2.2"
                                              }
                                      ,
                                       new List<string>()
                                              {
                                                  "2.1","2.2","2.3"
                                              }
                                      };
    //stopwatch using Linq
    Stopwatch stopwatch=new Stopwatch();
    stopwatch.Start();

    int totalUsingLinq = listOfList.Sum(x => x.Count);

    stopwatch.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("Using Linq:{0}",stopwatch.Elapsed); //00005713

    int totalUsingFor = 0;
    //stopwatch using classic for 
    stopwatch.Reset();
    stopwatch.Start();
    totalUsingFor = 0;
    for(int i=0;i<listOfList.Count;i++)
    {
       var mainItem = listOfList[i];
        if(mainItem!=null)
        {
            totalUsingFor += mainItem.Count;
        }
    }
    stopwatch.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("Using for:{0}", stopwatch.Elapsed); //0000010

}

distinct version using for (just for example). In this case I have create a very "bottleneck" function that does the distinct and it is still faster.

 public class Program
    {
      public static void Main(string[] arg)
        {
            //create the list
            List<List<string>> listOfList = new List<List<string>>()
                                      {
                                          new List<string>()
                                              {
                                                  "1.1","2.2","1.1","1.1","2.2","1.1","1.1","2.2","1.1","1.1"
                                              }
                                      ,
                                       new List<string>()
                                              {
                                                  "2.1","2.2","2.3","2.3","1.1","2.2","1.1","1.1","2.2","1.1","1.1","2.2","1.1","1.1","2.2","1.1","1.1","2.2","1.1"
                                              }
                                      };
            //stopwatch using Linq
            Stopwatch stopwatch = new Stopwatch();
            stopwatch.Start();

            int totalUsingLinq = listOfList.Sum(l => l.Distinct().Count());


            stopwatch.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("Using Linq:{0}", stopwatch.Elapsed); //000012150    
            int totalUsingFor = 0;
            //stopwatch using classic for 
            stopwatch.Reset();
            stopwatch.Start();
            totalUsingFor = 0;
            for (int i = 0; i < listOfList.Count; i++)
            {
                var mainItem = listOfList[i];
                if (mainItem != null)
                {
                    for(int y=0;y<mainItem.Count;y++)
                    {
                      if(mainItem[y]!=null)
                      {
                          totalUsingFor++;
                          NullDuplicateItems(y, ref mainItem);
                      }   
                    }
                }
            }
            stopwatch.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("Using for:{0}", stopwatch.Elapsed); //0009440
        }

        public static void NullDuplicateItems(int index,ref List<string > list)
        {
            var item = list[index];
            for(int i=index+1;i<list.Count;i++)
            {
                if(list[i]==item)
                {
                    list[i] = null;
                }
            }
        }

    }
share|improve this answer
    
You're missing the Distinct functionality, so it is a completely different problem from the OPs problem. And both examples take perhaps a few microseconds with such small lists as in your example. So unless they are a bottleneck it practice this is one example for using linq over the classic loop. – CodesInChaos Jun 1 '11 at 13:01
    
And when I ran each of them 100'000 times the factor was 40, not >100 – CodesInChaos Jun 1 '11 at 13:07
    
I didn't spend time on the code as I said: even if you add the distinct it will be at least 500 times quicker. In the example I didn't create a huge list because it is just an example but if want give it a go you can try my code againg a list with thousand of items and you will get the same result – Massimiliano Peluso Jun 1 '11 at 13:08
    
it is normal the factor is 40 not >100 because the machine you are running it is multi-tasking so that it can happen window is processing something during your test so you should run it lots of time and then caluclate the averge but the classic for will be always much faster: factor of 40 it a lot! – Massimiliano Peluso Jun 1 '11 at 13:09
1  
That's why you write code that's a performance bottleneck in the classic way. But if it isn't, don't bother. 40 times almost nothing is still almost nothing. – CodesInChaos Jun 1 '11 at 13:11

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