Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have read the PHP Manuel about array_filter

<?php
function odd($var)
{
    // returns whether the input integer is odd
    return($var & 1);
}

function even($var)
{
    // returns whether the input integer is even
    return(!($var & 1));
}

$array1 = array("a"=>1, "b"=>2, "c"=>3, "d"=>4, "e"=>5);
$array2 = array(6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12);

echo "Odd :\n";
print_r(array_filter($array1, "odd"));
echo "Even:\n";
print_r(array_filter($array2, "even"));
?>

Even I see the result here :

Odd :
Array
(
    [a] => 1
    [c] => 3
    [e] => 5
)
Even:
Array
(
    [0] => 6
    [2] => 8
    [4] => 10
    [6] => 12
)

But I did not understand about this line: return($var & 1); Could anyone explain me about this?

share|improve this question

8 Answers 8

up vote 2 down vote accepted

$var & 1 - is bitwise AND it checks if $var is ODD value

0 & 0 = 0,
0 & 1 = 0,
1 & 0 = 0,
1 & 1 = 1 

so, first callback function returns TRUE only if $var is ODD, and second - vise versa (! - is logical NOT).

share|improve this answer
    
you're right - my misprint) –  heximal Jun 1 '11 at 12:36
& 

it's the bitwise operator. It does the AND with the corrispondent bit of $var and 1

Basically it test the last bit of $var to see if the number is even or odd

Example with $var binary being 000110 and 1

000110 &
     1
------
     0

0 (false) in this case is returned so the number is even, and your function returns false accordingly

share|improve this answer
    
I understand it is AND. But how does ($var x & 1) determine whether is odd –  gilzero Jun 9 '12 at 9:01
    
It is AND, except it acts on each bit of the two numbers you compare individually (and returns an int), instead of the logical AND which acts on the two numbers as a whole (and returns a boolean). –  Artefact2 Jun 9 '12 at 9:02
    
doesn't make sense :( –  gilzero Jun 9 '12 at 9:05
5  
@gilzero Picture binary numbers.. 0001 = 1 (odd), 0011 = 3 (odd), 0010 = 2 (even). See the pattern? If the first (right-most) bit is 1 then the number is ALWAYS odd. So the comparison is checking to see if that bit is true or not.. if it is then its odd otherwise even. –  Mike B Jun 9 '12 at 9:06
1  
@gilzero - neither.... it's a bitwise operator - php.net/manual/en/language.operators.bitwise.php –  Mark Baker Jun 9 '12 at 10:04

You know && is AND, but what you probably don't know is & is a bit-wise AND.

The & operator works at a bit level, it is bit-wise. You need to think in terms of the binary representations of the operands.

e.g.

710 & 210 = 1112 & 0102 = 0102 = 210

For instance, the expression $var & 1 is used to test if the least significant bit is 1 or 0, odd or even respectively.

$var & 1

010 & 110 = 0002 & 0012 = 0002 = 010 = false (even)

110 & 110 = 0012 & 0012 = 0012 = 110 = true  (odd)

210 & 110 = 0102 & 0012 = 0002 = 010 = false (even)

310 & 110 = 0112 & 0012 = 0012 = 110 = true  (odd)

410 & 210 = 1002 & 0012 = 0002 = 010 = false (even)

and so on...

share|improve this answer
    
so ($var & 1) compares $var to number 1 ? –  gilzero Jun 9 '12 at 9:21
    
yes, at a bit level. –  Alexander Jun 9 '12 at 9:26

It is performing a bitwise AND with $var and 1. Since 1 only has the last bit set, $var & 1 will only be true if the last bit is set in $var. And since even numbers never have the last bit set, if the AND is true the number must be odd.

share|improve this answer

& is bitwise "and" operator. With 1, 3, 5 (and other odd numbers) $var & 1 will result in "1", with 0, 2, 4 (and other even numbers) - in "0".

share|improve this answer

An odd number has its zeroth (least significant) bit set to 1:

           v
0 = 00000000b
1 = 00000001b
2 = 00000010b
3 = 00000011b
           ^

The expression $var & 1 performs a bitwise AND operation between $var and 1 (1 = 00000001b). So the expression will return:

  • 1 when $var has its zeroth bit set to 1 (odd number)
  • 0 when $var has its zeroth bit set to 0 (even number)
share|improve this answer
    
That's not three :) –  Alexander Jun 9 '12 at 9:13
    
Whoops... fixed. –  Salman A Jun 9 '12 at 9:16

& is a bitwise AND on $var.

If $var is a decimal 4, it's a binary 100. 100 & 1 is 100, because the right most digit is a 0 in $var - and 0 & 1 is 0, thus, 4 is even.

share|improve this answer

it returns 0 or 1, depending on your $var

if $var is odd number, ex. (1, 3, 5 ...) it $var & 1 returns 1, otherwise (2, 4, 6) $var & 1 returns 0

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.