Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Sometimes I start a MATLAB script and realize too late that it is going to output way too many figures. Eventually I get an

Exception in thread "AWT-EventQueue-0" java.lang.OutOfMemoryError: Java heap space

which can easily be reproduced on my machine using

for i=1:inf
  figure;
end

I get to around ~90 figures before it crashes with the standard setting (Preferences / Java Heap Memory) of 128 MB Java heap, while doubling the Heap to 256 MB gives me around 200 figures.

Do you see any way to avoid the Java error message? If there is not enough memory for another figure, I'd like my script to be told rather than crash.

Maybe I could have a wrapper for figure which (somehow?) checks how much Java heap is available and which refuses to open a new figure if there is not enough space left?

Update

Using the answers below, I get a nice graph for how much free Memory Java has:

figure;plot(freeMem/1E6,'x');ylabel('java.lang.Runtime.getRuntime.freeMemory [MB]');xlabel('number of empty figures created');

This was produced using

for i=1:inf
    java.lang.Runtime.getRuntime.gc
    fprintf('%3.0f: %1.0f Byte free\n',i,java.lang.Runtime.getRuntime.freeMemory);
    figure;
end

I assume the increase in the beginning means that garbage collection only does a certain effort every time I call it?

Update 2 - my solution

Using the help I got here, I implemented the following solution as a figure.m which overloads and calls the build-in figure command:

function varargout=figure(varargin)
memcutoff = 10E6; % keep at least this amount of bytes free
memkeyboard= 3E6; % if memory drops below this, interrupt execution and go to keyboard mode
global refuse_new_figures
if refuse_new_figures
    warning('jb:fig:lowjavamem2','Java WAS memory low -> refusing to create a new figure. To reset, type "global refuse_new_figures ; refuse_new_figures = [];"');
    return
end
freemem=java.lang.Runtime.getRuntime.freeMemory;
if freemem < memcutoff 
    fprintf('Free memory is low (%1.0f Bytes) -> running garbace collector...\n',freemem);
    java.lang.Runtime.getRuntime.gc
end
freemem=java.lang.Runtime.getRuntime.freeMemory;
% fprintf('Free memory is %1.0f Bytes.\n',freemem);
if freemem < memkeyboard
    warning('jb:fig:lowjavamem','Java memory very low -> going into interactive mode. Good luck!');
    keyboard;
end
if freemem < memcutoff
    warning('jb:fig:lowjavamem','Java memory low -> refusing to create a new figure!');
    refuse_new_figures=true;
else
    if nargin > 0
        if nargout > 0
            varargout{1}=builtin('figure',varargin{:});
        else
            builtin('figure',varargin{:});
        end
    else
        if nargout > 0
            varargout{1}=builtin('figure');
        else
            builtin('figure');
        end
    end
end
share|improve this question
    
Nice update. I'd vote this up a second time if I could. I wonder whether the increase might be due to Java allocating more memory. –  Jonas Jun 1 '11 at 13:47
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In general, I'd suggest setting maximum Java Heap Memory to about 25% of the available RAM, which allows you to open lots of figures (but not infinite numbers). If you cannot do this in the preferences (e.g. b/c you have a Mac like mine), this solution will help - it overrides the preference settings.

The linked solution also tells you how much free java memory you have left, and how much total is available: Run the following commands:

java.lang.Runtime.getRuntime.maxMemory
java.lang.Runtime.getRuntime.totalMemory
java.lang.Runtime.getRuntime.freeMemory 

Unfortunately, a figure doesn't take a fixed amount of Java memory, an empty figure takes much less than one displaying 10k points, and a minimized figure takes less memory than a maximized one. However, if you can estimate the average memory needed per figure, you can indeed write a wrapper for figure that checks whether it's likely that this figure will be the last. Alternatively/additionally, you could make the wrapper function minimize all other figures (see Undocumented Matlab for this).

EDIT As pointed out by @Peter Lawrey, you may also try and perform garbage collection before checking how much memory is available - though I don't know whether Matlab would try that, anyway.

share|improve this answer
2  
freeMemory only tells you how much is free now, not how much would be free if you performed a GC. –  Peter Lawrey Jun 1 '11 at 12:51
add comment

You can check the free memory, if there is no enough trigger a GC and check again. If there is still not enough, fail. You might want to allow 1-10 MB head room.

You can use Runtime.gc() and Runtime.freeMemory();

If you don't set the maximum memory it will make it a percentage of the available memory.

share|improve this answer
1  
GC will always occur automatically before a JVM throws an OutOfMemory error, so an explicit call to Runtime.gc() is not really necessary to free up space, but surely helps to get corerect figures for the usable memory. One thing to remember ist that the VM decides when to GC, Runtime.gc() calls do not in every case cause a garbage collection to occur. –  BertNase Jun 1 '11 at 12:54
    
Matlab will set a maximum java memory available for the program, all one can do is choose how much this should be. –  Jonas Jun 1 '11 at 12:58
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.