Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

After pressing ctrl+c I get the following output. Regarding to the code, why does the line signal 2 was raised, exiting... appear several times even I pressed the keys only once?

My output looks like that:

-sh-2.05b# ./proxyp 192.168.1.100
shmget id: 65538
signal 10 was raised, should write out
signal 10 was raised, should write out
signal 2 was raised, exiting...
signal 2 was raised, exiting...
signal 2 was raised, exiting...
signal 2 was raised, exiting...
signal 2 was raised, exiting...

My source for the thread handling the signals looks like that (the program is not yet finished, so don't worry about the shared memory or anything else):

/* global variables */
wuint32 sh_id;

/* signal handlers */
void sgn_exit_programm(int sig, siginfo_t *siginfo, void *context);
void sgn_write_stdout(int sig, siginfo_t *siginfo, void *context);

/* main thread */
void *mgmtSrvcThread(port_configuration_data *p) {
struct sigaction sig_action_exit, sig_action_write;

shared_data sh_data = p->sh_mem;
sh_id = sh_data.shm_id;

wuint32 shm, shmid;

if((shmid = shmget(MEMKEY, MAXMYMEM, 0666)) < 0) {
    perror("shmget");
    exit(1);
}

if((shm = shmat(shmid, NULL, 0)) == (char *) -1) {
    perror("shmat");
    exit(1);
}

/* Set up the structure to specify the new action */
sig_action_exit.sa_handler = sgn_exit_programm;
sig_action_write.sa_handler = sgn_write_stdout;
sigaction(SIGINT, &sig_action_exit, NULL);
sigaction(SIGUSR1, &sig_action_write, NULL);

while(1) {
    sleep(1);
}

return (void*)0;
}


void sgn_write_stdout(int sig, siginfo_t *siginfo, void *context) {
    printf("signal %d was raised, should write out\n", sig);
}


void sgn_exit_programm(int sig, siginfo_t *siginfo, void *context)
{
    printf("signal %d was raised, exiting...\n", sig);
    sleep(1);
    exit(0);
}

Maybe little bit more about it: I handle several threads within a master. One of the threads is just a management thread that shall handle the output to stdout and handles signals. The source is above. Inside the shared memory the message shall appear that the thread should write to stdout. That's it.

update after adding more code, it is sure that the handler is called more than once.

void sgn_exit_programm(int sig, siginfo_t *siginfo, void *context)
{
printf("signal %d was raised, exiting...\n", sig);
fflush(stdout);
if(shmdt(data) < 0) {
    perror("shmdt");
    exit(1);
} else {
    printf("detached successful\n");
}

sleep(1);
exit(0);
}

And that's the output for it, as you can see, the detaching task is done once successfully:

-sh-2.05b# ./proxyp 192.168.1.100
shmget id: 65538
signal 2 was raised, exiting...
detached successful
signal 2 was raised, exiting...
shmdt: Invalid argument
signal 2 was raised, exiting...
shmdt: Invalid argument
signal 2 was raised, exiting...
shmdt: Invalid argument
signal 2 was raised, exiting...
shmdt: Invalid argument

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
1  
Do your threads create child processes e.g. use fork()? –  SlappyTheFish Jun 1 '11 at 14:31
    
@Slappy: +1 OP claims to be using threads, but I see no thread code, and shared memory functions suggest that OP is in fact using processes, i.e. hiding a key fact needed to address the problem. -1 to OP for misleading question with missing information. –  R.. Jun 1 '11 at 18:40
    
Misleading information? Hmmm, however. I am not using processes, in the main I start right now 2 threads, one just listening on a socket and another one to handle signals and the output (code above). I am not using fork(), because some people (in another post here) told me not to mix them. In the future there shall be more threads, actually four, and all of them shall write into a shared memory whatever should appear on stdout, and this one is handling that. I just want one thread to handle the output. Still misleading? I am not in the company anymore, so I don't have the code here, sry. –  nyyrikki Jun 1 '11 at 22:03

2 Answers 2

Don't "do work" in your signal handler. Set a flag and handle it in your normal program flow. Working with signals and threads is also interesting business. My guess is that things are getting confused because more than one thread sees the signal and attempts to react to it. I believe the "main" thread is the only thread that is supposed to receive the signal, but it may be undefined (it's been a while, sorry).

This link may also be of use (first site on google search): http://uw714doc.sco.com/en/SDK_sysprog/PTL_ThdsSigs.html

If you set a bit somewhere (global variable or something else), you'll be able to at least handle the signal in the normal flow of the program and if the signal happens twice, it'll only set the bit true twice which is of no consequence.

share|improve this answer

May be the printf statement in SIGINT signal handler resides in stdout buffer, so when every threads is exiting, its printing that statement & then exiting.

Can you put fflush(stdout); statement after printf() statement & try it again.

share|improve this answer
    
This, and only one thread should call exit(). Maybe the worker threads should block the signal? –  Simon Richter Jun 1 '11 at 13:05
    
it's not the reason...sorry. thanks anyways –  nyyrikki Jun 1 '11 at 13:07
    
@Simon Richter: The signal handler is implemented just inside this file, no where else. So only that one should be called, right? –  nyyrikki Jun 1 '11 at 13:11
1  
The signal handler is set for the entire process, and generally does not care much about file boundaries. The signal is delivered to any thread that has not blocked the signal, and the exit() cleans up the entire process from that thread (which is somewhat okay) while the other threads are still running (which leads to curious and interesting behaviour) –  Simon Richter Jun 1 '11 at 13:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.