Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I use ternary operators alot but I can't seem to stack multiple ternary operator inside each other.

I am aware that stacking multiple ternary operator would make the code less readable but in some case I would like to do it.

This is what I've tried so far :

$foo = 1;
$bar = ( $foo == 1 ) ? "1" : ( $foo == 2 ) ? "2" : "other";
echo $bar; // display 2 instead of 1

What is the correct syntax ?

share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of nested php ternary trouble: ternary output != if - else –  Marc B Jun 1 '11 at 15:05
    
Great answer everyone. –  Cybrix Jun 1 '11 at 15:22

8 Answers 8

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Those parenthesis are what I think is getting you.

Try

$foo = 1;
$bar = ($foo == 1) ? "1" : (($foo == 2)  ? "2" : "other");
echo $bar;
share|improve this answer

The problem is that PHP, unlike all other languages, makes the conditional operator left associative. This breaks your code – which would be fine in other languages.

You need to use parentheses:

$bar = $foo == 1 ? "1" : ($foo == 2 ? "2" : "other");

(Notice that I’ve removed the other parentheses from your code; but these were correct, just redundant.)

share|improve this answer
    
"Notice that I’ve removed the other parentheses from your code; but these were correct, just redundant" - but with a parser like that, you can never be sure... ;-) –  Alnitak Jun 1 '11 at 15:06

You need some parentheses around the right hand operand:

$foo = 1;
$bar = ( $foo == 1 ) ? "1" : (( $foo == 2 ) ? "2" : "other");
echo $bar;

PHP's interpreter is broken, and treats your line:

$bar = ( $foo == 1 ) ? "1" : ( $foo == 2 ) ? "2" : "other";

as

$bar = (( $foo == 1) ? "1" : ( $foo == 2)) ? "2" : "other";

and since that left hand expression evaluates as "true" the first operand of the remaining ternary operator ("2") is returned instead.

share|improve this answer
    
-1 Broken? The parser behaves exactly as defined by PHPs operator precedence and associativity overview: php.net/manual/en/language.operators.precedence.php –  NikiC Jun 1 '11 at 15:24
2  
@nikic PHP's manual documented the implementation - the documents don't define the implementation, as PHP never had a formal specification. The implementation is broken (i.e. different) when compared to every other language that supports the ternary operator. –  Alnitak Jun 1 '11 at 16:16
    
If you meant to say that it was different to what you are used to, why not say just that? –  NikiC Jun 1 '11 at 17:05
4  
@nikic I said exactly what I meant to say. Any sane language "design" would have followed the precedent set by C, C++, Java, etc. –  Alnitak Jun 1 '11 at 17:13

You could write this correctly thus:

$bar = ($foo == 1) ? "1" : (($foo == 2) ? "2" : "other");

(i.e.: Simply embed the 'inner' ternary operator in parenthesis.)

However, I'd be really tempted not to do this, as it's about as readable as a particularly illegible thing that's been badly smudged - there's never any excuse for obfuscating code, and this borders on it.

share|improve this answer

Put parenthesis around each inner ternary operator, this way operator priority is assured:

$bar = ( $foo == 1 ) ? "1" : (( $foo == 2 ) ? "2" : "other");
share|improve this answer

Add the parenthesis:

$bar = ( $foo == 1 ) ? "1" : (( $foo == 2 ) ? "2" : "other");
share|improve this answer

Just stack up the parenthesis, and you've got it:

$bar = ($foo==1? "1" : ($foo==2? "2" : "other"));

As an aside, if you've got many clauses, you should consider using a switch:

switch ( $bar ) {
  case 1:  echo "1";
  case 2:  echo "2";
  default: echo "other";
}

If the switch gets long, you can wrap it in a function.

share|improve this answer
$foo = 1;
$bar = ( $foo == 1 ) ? "1" : (( $foo == 2 ) ? "2" : "other");
echo $bar;

Just use extra ( ) and it will work

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.