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I'm using the Python "datetime" module, i.e.:

>>> import datetime
>>> today = datetime.datetime.now()
>>> print today
2009-03-06 13:24:58.857946

and I would like to compute the day of year that is sensitive of leap years. e.g. oday (March 6, 2009) is the 65th day of 2009. Here's web-based DateTime calculator.

Anyway, I see a two options:

  1. Create a number_of_days_in_month array = [31, 28, ...], decide if it's a leap year, manually sum up the days

  2. Use datetime.timedelta to make a guess & then binary search for the correct day of year:

.

>>> import datetime
>>> YEAR = 2009
>>> DAY_OF_YEAR = 62
>>> d = datetime.date(YEAR, 1, 1) + datetime.timedelta(DAY_OF_YEAR - 1)

These both feel pretty clunky & I have a gut feeling that there's a more "Pythonic" way of calculating day of year. Any ideas/suggestions?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 87 down vote accepted

There is a very simple solution:

day_of_year = datetime.now().timetuple().tm_yday
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2  
A very minor and arguably pedantic addition, but using date.today() rather than datetime.now() also works and emphasizes the nature of the operation a bit more. –  Jeremy Dec 30 '13 at 6:57
1  
Better yet: time.localtime().tm_yday No need to convert a datetime to a timetuple since that's what localtime() yields. –  Mike Ellis Apr 29 at 13:36
    
@MikeEllis But this solution illustrates what to do when the datetime does not correspond to today. –  gerrit Jun 24 at 18:49

Couldn't you use strftime?

>>> import datetime
>>> today = datetime.datetime.now()
>>> print today
2009-03-06 15:37:02.484000
>>> today.strftime('%j')
'065'

Edit

As noted in the comments, if you wish to do comparisons or calculations with this number, you would have to convert it to int() because strftime() returns a string. If that is the case, you are better off using DzinX's answer.

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Brilliant--I knew there was some obvious way of doing it. Thanks! –  Pete Mar 6 '09 at 20:40
    
-1: icky. Better is the "today minus january 1st" algorithm. Much cleaner and perfectly obvious without looking up a piece of trivia about strftime's '%j'. –  S.Lott Mar 6 '09 at 21:16
3  
Seriously? How is this icky and substracting january 1st isn't? strftime is there for a reason. I just don't agree. This is WAY cleaner in my opinion. –  Paolo Bergantino Mar 6 '09 at 21:53
    
Using strftime is indirect, because it produces a string from a number: the timetuple.tm_yday member. Read the source. The produced string should be converted to a number before any calculations/comparisons, so why bother? –  tzot Mar 8 '09 at 13:52

Just subtract january 1 from the date:

import datetime
today = datetime.datetime.now()
day_of_year = (today - datetime.datetime(today.year, 1, 1)).days + 1
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+1: The standard, correct algorithm. –  S.Lott Mar 6 '09 at 21:13
2  
Cute, but hardly "The standard, correct algorithm." –  Matthew Schinckel Mar 7 '09 at 0:35
    
Nothing against Paolo, but datetime.timedelta is denominated in days (as well as seconds and microseconds, of course), so it's a natural choice---certainly more direct than string formatting –  zweiterlinde Mar 7 '09 at 2:27
1  
d.toordinal() - date(d.year, 1, 1).toordinal() + 1 is more standard according to the documentation. It is equivalent to the accepted answer without producing the whole time tuple. –  Dingle Apr 30 '10 at 19:52

DZinX's answer is a great answer for the question. I found this question while looking for the inverse function. I found this to work :

import datetime
datetime.datetime.strptime('1936-077T13:14:15','%Y-%jT%H:%M:%S')

>>>> datetime.datetime(1936, 3, 17, 13, 14, 15)

datetime.datetime.strptime('1936-077T13:14:15','%Y-%jT%H:%M:%S').timetuple().tm_yday

>>>> 77

I'm not sure of etiquette around here, but I thought a pointer to the inverse function might be useful for others like me.

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I want to present performance of different approaches, on Python 3.4, Linux x64. Excerpt from line profiler:

      Line #      Hits         Time  Per Hit   % Time  Line Contents
      ==============================================================
         (...)
         823      1508        11334      7.5     41.6          yday = int(period_end.strftime('%j'))
         824      1508         2492      1.7      9.1          yday = period_end.toordinal() - date(period_end.year, 1, 1).toordinal() + 1
         825      1508         1852      1.2      6.8          yday = (period_end - date(period_end.year, 1, 1)).days + 1
         826      1508         5078      3.4     18.6          yday = period_end.timetuple().tm_yday
         (...)

So most efficient is

yday = (period_end - date(period_end.year, 1, 1)).days
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