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I have a class which is designed to take a collection of any type of object and create an export (e.g. Excel spreadsheet) of it. I can supply column names and widths as I choose:

Here is a summary of the class:

public class ObjectExporter
{
    public string Export<T>(IEnumerable<T> objects, IEnumerable<ColumnDefinition> columnDefinitions)
    {
      //Iterate through list of ColumnDefinitions.
      //Output value of the property in each object...
      //...whose name is equal to the PropertyName of the current ColumnDefinition
    }
}

Here is the ColumnDefinition class:

public class ColumnDefinition  {
    public string ColumnName { get; set; }
    public string PropertyName { get; set; }
    public int Width { get; set; }
    public ColumnDefinition(string columnName, string propertyName, int width)
    {
      ColumnName = columnName;
      PropertyName = propertyName;
      Width = width;
    }
  }

And here's an example of usage:

private void TestObjectExporter()
{
      ObjectExporter objectExporter = new ObjectExporter();
      //Note that the following variable changeRequests is a collection of anonymous type
      var changeRequests = ChangeRequestRepository.All.Take(5).Select(x => new { x.ChangeRequested, x.DateCreated, x.CreatedBy.Username });
      Response.Write(objectExporter.Export(changeRequests, new List<ColumnDefinition>()
                                              {
                                                new ColumnDefinition("Change Requested", "ChangeRequested", 12),
                                                new ColumnDefinition("Date Created", "DateCreated", 12),
                                                new ColumnDefinition("Created By", "Username", 12)
                                              }));
}

It is critical that ObjectExporter can work with collections of anonymous types. I would like to amend the ObjectExporter and ColumnDefinition classes to use strongly-typed syntax like the following (note how the property names are specified):

Response.Write(objectExporter.Export(changeRequests, new List<ColumnDefinition>()
                                              {
                                                new ColumnDefinition("Change Requested", x => x.ChangeRequested, 12),
                                                new ColumnDefinition("Date Created", x => x.DateCreated, 12),
                                                new ColumnDefinition("Created By", x => x.Username, 12)
                                              }));

I believe the way to do this would be to create a ColumnDefinition<T> class. However, I cannot find a way to get the compiler to infer that T being used in the IEnumerable<ColumnDefinition<T>> parameter is the same as is being used in the IEnumerable<T> parameter. This means that I cannot use the class with collections of anonymous types anymore because I cannot explicitly specify the generic type arguments.

Can anyone work out a way to do this?

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Yes, this is a repost of stackoverflow.com/questions/6157753/…. I decided to repost because I had not explained my requirements well enough. –  David Jun 1 '11 at 15:02
    
What did you try? Post your attempted code with ColumnDefinition<T> –  CodesInChaos Jun 4 '11 at 10:17
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3 Answers

In your column definition class, you would do something like this:

public class ColumnDefinition<T>
{
     public ColumnDefinition(string displayName, Expression<Func<T, string>> propertyExpression, int width)
     {
     }
}

Your object exporter signature would also change:

public string Export<T>(IEnumerable<T> items, IEnumerable<ColumnDefinition<T>> columns)
{
}

Then, the type of T should be inferred from the enumerable being passed, and thus the second parameter would expect an IEnumerable>, which then means your ColumnDefinition class infers type T, and then the expression in the constructor picks up T.

EDIT: Alternatively:

Wrap your Enumerable into another class and then call methods on it.

public class ObjectWrapper<T> : IDisposable
{
     public IEnumerable<T> Items { get; protected set; }
     public IEnumerable<ColumnDefinition> Definitions { get; set; }     

     public ObjectWrapper(IEnumerable<T> source) 
     { 
         Items = source; 
         Definitions = new List<ColumnDefinition>(); 
     }

     public void AddColumnDefinition(string name, Expression<Func<T, string>> propertyExpression, int width)
     {
          /* Add Column Definition with Expression Data */
     }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, this is what I had in mind, but IntelliSense says 'Incorrect number of type parameters in reference to class ColumnDefinition<T>'. –  David Jun 1 '11 at 15:13
    
Updated with another option. –  Tejs Jun 1 '11 at 15:21
    
After your update: how do I instantiate the ObjectWrapper<T> class with an anonymous type? –  David Jun 1 '11 at 15:42
    
new ObjectWrapper(myEnumerable) should work, even with an unknown anonymous type enumerable. –  Tejs Jun 1 '11 at 15:42
    
To the best of my knowledge, the compiler can't do this kind of type inference at all: var objectWrapper = new ObjectWrapper(changeRequests);. It demands to know the type of T. –  David Jun 1 '11 at 15:51
show 2 more comments

It's going to be a bit tricky without using a few hacks to force type inference. How about something like this?

Response.Write(objectExporter.Export(changeRequests, new[]
    {
        changeRequests.GetColumnDef("Change Requested", x => x.ChangeRequested, 12),
        changeRequests.GetColumnDef("Date Created", x => x.DateCreated, 12),
        changeRequests.GetColumnDef("Created By", x => x.Username, 12)
    }));

// ...

public class ColumnDefinition<T>
{
    public string ColumnName { get; private set; }
    public Func<T, object> Selector { get; private set; }
    public int Width { get; private set; }

    public ColumnDefinition(string columnName, Func<T, object> selector, int width)
    {
        ColumnName = columnName;
        Selector = selector;
        Width = width;
    }
}

public static class ColumnDefinitionHelper
{
    public static ColumnDefinition<T> GetColumnDef<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source,
        string columnName, Func<T, object> selector, int width)
    {
        return new ColumnDefinition<T>(columnName, selector, width);
    }
}

public class ObjectExporter
{
    public string Export<T>(
        IEnumerable<T> objects, IEnumerable<ColumnDefinition<T>> columnDefinitions)
    {
        // ...
    }
}
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If your change is not really generic, don't use generics.

If you can't substitute T with an Interface instance that is being implemented in T don't use generics. It doesn't make sense.

share|improve this answer
    
Eh? If I COULD substitute T for an interface then I wouldn't need generics. In this case I do, because I might pass a collection of any type in. I don't understand what you mean at all. –  David Jun 5 '11 at 8:20
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