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I'm trying to run the following code

int[] sbox = new int[256];
String inputString = "Thisisanexample";
String sTemp;
char cTmp;
int intLength = inputString.length();

for (a = 0; a <= 255; a++)
{
    sTemp = inputString.substring(a % intLength, 1);
    ctmp = sTemp.toCharArray()[0];
    sbox[a] = (int)ctmp;
}

Every time i run the code I get a java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException when the counter variable = 1. Checking the code in the debugger, it appears the substring is returning an empty string when it should be returning the second character in the inputString.

Can anyone advise why this would be the case?

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Probably should have checked a better source. I googled it and skimmed to this as the top answer "We have two numbers in the code above, 0 and 2. This means start grabbing characters at position 0 in the string, and stop grabbing when you have two of them." so I assumed it was the same as c#. Since it was taking place in an iteration and the numbers looked good, I for some reason didn't figure it out. Cheers for all the answers. –  Dale Jun 1 '11 at 17:17
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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

String.substring() expects a start and a end index, not the length. So you need to add the length to the start index:

for (a = 0; a <= 255; a++)
{
    int index = a % intLength;
    sTemp = inputString.substring( index, index + 1 );
    ctmp = sTemp.toCharArray()[0];
    sbox[a] = (int)ctmp;
}

You can also avoid the creation of sub strings in this case. This would give you the same results:

for (a = 0; a <= 255; a++)
{
    ctmp = inputString.charAt(a % intLength);
    sbox[a] = ctmp;
}
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Thank you, not sure how I missed it. Your second example seems much more elegant, I'll go with that. –  Dale Jun 1 '11 at 16:44
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If in doubt check the javadoc this shows you that substring() does not do what you think it does...

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You might give the poor guy a hint and tell him where he's misunderstanding the function. Saying "Your program gives the wrong output because it contains an error" is true but not very useful. –  Jay Jun 1 '11 at 15:58
    
@Jay It was already answered with the correct answer, I suppose this should have been a comment rather than answer... –  Tnem Jun 3 '11 at 8:18
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When you use the debugger, you can see that the first time round the loop, you get one character and the second time you get no characters.

That is because String.substring(int start, int end) takes the end, not the length.

BTW: You can just write

int[] sbox = new int[256];
String inputString = "Thisisanexample";
for(int i = 0; i < sbox.length; i++)
    sbox[i] = inputString.charAt(i % inputString.length());
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String.substring(begining, endIndexExclusive) when a=1, beginIndex=1, endIndexExclusive=1 =>
sTemp == "" =>
toCharArray() returns empty array => [0] indexOutOfBounds

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