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Hey everyone. Here is my situation... I need to craft a sql query against a postgresql server that will return all records created within the past 5 minutes, rounded down to the lowest minute. So if cron kicks the query off at 12:05:25.000, it needs to query all records created since 12:00:00.000. So I guess I really have two issues.

Here is the current query:

select * from callhistory where created>date_trunc('minute', timestamp (current_timestamp-interval '5' minute));

It doesn't return anything. Also, the format of the created field is "2011-05-18 18:11:32.024."

Any help would be appreciated.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The syntax is your date_trunc is a bit off:

select *
from callhistory
where created > date_trunc('minute', current_timestamp - interval '5' minute)

You could also use now() in place of current_timestamp:

select *
from callhistory
where created > date_trunc('minute', now() - interval '5' minute)

And an example:

=> create table stuff (created timestamp not null);
=> insert into stuff (created) values (current_timestamp);
-- Wait a could seconds...
=> insert into stuff (created) values (current_timestamp);
=> select * from stuff where created > date_trunc('minute', current_timestamp - interval '5' minute);
          created           
----------------------------
 2011-06-01 11:32:55.672027
 2011-06-01 11:33:00.182953
=> select * from stuff where created > date_trunc('minute', current_timestamp - interval '7' day);
          created           
----------------------------
 2011-06-01 11:32:55.672027
 2011-06-01 11:33:00.182953

UPDATE: Looks like PostgreSQL version 8 is a little stricter on the format for interval, the fine manual says that you should use interval '$n $unit' where $n is the number of things and $unit is the time unit. Version 9 allows you to say interval '$n' $unit without complaint but version 8 converts your interval to 0 if you don't use the documented format. So, you should use this for both version 8 and version 9:

select *
from callhistory
where created > date_trunc('minute', current_timestamp - interval '5 minute')
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Hm, I tried it and am still getting no results. I also tried using interval '7' day and interval '1' month with no luck. The latest record was created on the 27th, so one of them should have returned something. Could it have to do with the format of the timestamp including the timezone? –  Matthew Jun 1 '11 at 17:15
1  
CURRENT_TIMESTAMP is fine - now(), although fully equivalent, is non-standard. –  Milen A. Radev Jun 1 '11 at 17:23
    
@Milen: That's why I corrected my comments about current_timestamp in my original answer. –  mu is too short Jun 1 '11 at 17:27
    
Sadly I can't include the schema because its for a proprietary vendor DB :( Essentially the fields are like this: created|modified|call_stat_1|call_stat_2|call_stat_3|...|call_stat_N Basically i need to fetch all of the records that have been created in the past 5 minutes. However due to the number of records, precision is important (hence making sure that it runs for exactly a 5 minute span of time). –  Matthew Jun 1 '11 at 17:40
    
@Matthew: Can you at least tell us what the column type for created is and include some sample data? –  mu is too short Jun 1 '11 at 17:45
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Here is a sample test I did against a PostgreSQL 8.3 server. You did not mention the version you are running.

select current_timestamp, to_char((current_timestamp - '5 minutes'::interval), 'yyyy-mm-dd HH:mi:00')::timestamp;

The interval deducts the 5 minutes and to_char() method rounds down to the closest minute. If this is what you are looking for, then the query should look as follows:

select * from callhistory where created > to_char((current_timestamp - '5 minutes'::interval), 'yyyy-mm-dd HH:mi:00')::timestamp
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