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I found a few references to regex filtering out non-English but none of them is in Java, aside from the fact that they are all referring to somewhat different problems than what I am trying to solve:

  1. Replace all non-English characters with a space.
  2. Create a method that returns true if a string contains any non-English character.

By "English text" I mean not only actual letters and numbers but also punctuation.

So far, what I have been able to come with for goal #1 is quite simple:

String.replaceAll("\\W", " ")

In fact, so simple that I suspect that I am missing something... Do you spot any caveats in the above?

As for goal #2, I could simply trim() the string after the above replaceAll(), then check if it's empty. But... Is there a more efficient way to do this?

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5  
there are a handful of legitimate English words which contain accented characters - eg "naïve". –  Spudley Jun 1 '11 at 16:35
1  
I think you need to define what you mean by "English text"... i.e. is the following sentence considered "English text" or not? "Her fiancé's name is José Brontë." –  Nate Jun 1 '11 at 16:46
    
@Spudley @Nate You are both correct of course. For my particular case, "Her fiancé's name is José Brontë." is not considered all English and thus the method should return true. –  Regex Rookie Jun 1 '11 at 16:52
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In fact, so simple that I suspect that I am missing something... Do you spot any caveats in the above?

\W is equivalent to [^\w], and \w is equivalent to [a-zA-Z_0-9]. Using \W will replace everything which isn't a letter, a number, or an underscore — like tabs and newline characters. Whether or not that's a problem is really up to you.

By "English text" I mean not only actual letters and numbers but also punctuation.

In that case, you might want to use a character class which omits punctuation; something like

[^\w.,;:'"]

Create a method that returns true if a string contains any non-English character.

Use Pattern and Matcher.

Pattern p = Pattern.compile("\\W");

boolean containsSpecialChars(String string)
{
    Matcher m = p.matcher(string);
    return m.find();
}
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-1 This won't work. You need to use matcher.find() or change your regex to match the whole string. –  dogbane Jun 1 '11 at 16:46
    
@dogbane you're right, thanks for the correction. Fixed. –  Matt Ball Jun 1 '11 at 17:03
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Assuming an english word is made up of characters from: [a-zA-Z_0-9]

To return true if a string contains any non-English character, use string.matches:

return !string.matches("^\\w+$");
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@dogbane Why the ^ and the $? –  Regex Rookie Jun 1 '11 at 16:46
    
@regex-rookie it's not necessary, but I'm making it clear that I am matching the whole string from start to end. –  dogbane Jun 1 '11 at 16:48
    
@dogbane Your regex doesn't seem to work with a string that starts (or ends) with non-English characters. Can you confirm this? –  Regex Rookie Jun 1 '11 at 17:02
    
@regex-rookie yes it does. My statement returns true as required. –  dogbane Jun 1 '11 at 17:04
    
@dogbane Your regex still doesn't work. Try placing an all-English text with only one non-English character in it on regexplanet.com/simple/index.html and see what I mean. –  Regex Rookie Jun 1 '11 at 17:38
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