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If SSL is handled by a load balancer, do I still need to configure it in the WCF serviceCertificate node? My scenario is to use message level security. If someone can explain how load balancing with wcf and ssl works, that would be very nice.

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If you want to use message security you don't need SSL. – Ladislav Mrnka Jun 1 '11 at 19:30
    
But doesn't wcf require you to have an ssl certificate if you use message level security. – Xaisoft Jun 1 '11 at 19:32
1  
It requires certificate but it is not used to establish SSL connection. – Ladislav Mrnka Jun 1 '11 at 19:40
    
@Ladislav, sorry for my confusion. That is what I mean. If the certificate is handled by a load balancer, do I need to specify the certificate in wcf config file or does the load balancer take care of that for me. I am thinking I need to specify the location of the certificate in wcf because once I specify message security, it is going to tell me I need a certificate. Is this correct? – Xaisoft Jun 1 '11 at 19:43
up vote 4 down vote accepted

WCF requires security tokens to be passed over a secure transport if the message itself is not signed/encrypted. Since traffic is HTTP between your Big-IP and your individual web servers, you need a way to have security tokens that you know are secured between the client and the Big-IP up front still be passed to your server farm. There's a couple ways to do that depending on what version of WCF you're using:

If you're using WCF 4.0 you can just create a custom binding and set the AllowInsecureTransport property on the built in SecurityBindingElement to signify that you don't care that the transport isn't secure.

If you're using WCF 3.5 you have to "lie" about security with a custom TransportSecurityBindingElement on the server side. You can read my old post about this here.

FWIW, they created a hotfix release for 3.5 SP1 that adds the AllowInsecureTransport to that version, but I don't know if your company will allow you to install custom hotfixes.

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We could never get AllowInsecureTransport to work on the secure side bindings. Good luck. – Adam Dymitruk Jun 1 '11 at 22:08
    
+1 for the link to custom security element. – Ladislav Mrnka Jun 1 '11 at 22:31
    
The only problem is that OP doesn't know what he wants. Title is asking for load balancing with transport security and the question is asking for load balancing with message security. – Ladislav Mrnka Jun 1 '11 at 22:34
    
@LadislavMrnka - I think OP means TransportWithMessageCredential but not sure. One question, if my binding security looks like <security mode="TransportWithMessageCredential"> <transport clientCredentialType="None" proxyCredentialType="None" realm="" /> <message clientCredentialType="Certificate" /> </security> - am I using transport security? – VoodooChild May 23 '13 at 6:50
    
@LadislavMrnka- I am just about to read your answer to stackoverflow.com/q/5673283/247184 so hang on :) – VoodooChild May 23 '13 at 6:54

If you want to use message security then each message is encrypted and signed separately - there is no secure connection and load balancer behaves as with any other HTTP transport. Loadbalancer doesn't know about security and doesn't need certificate.

There are two gotchas:

  • All load balanced application servers hosting your WCF service must use the same certificate
  • You must ensure that your WCF binding doesn't use sessions (reliable, security) otherwise you will need load balancing algorithm with sticky sessions (all request for single session always routed to the same server)
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What do you mean by "there is no secure connection.." and when you say all Load Balanced Servers must use the same certificate, are you referring to the servers behind the load balancer? You also sate that bindings don't use security, are you referring to message security? – Xaisoft Jun 1 '11 at 19:47
    
Well, I think you don't fully understand the difference between transport and message security. – Ladislav Mrnka Jun 1 '11 at 19:51
    
I'm referring to servers behind the load balancer. I didn't mention that you don't use security, I mentioned that you cannot use Security session also known as security context or secure conversation. – Ladislav Mrnka Jun 1 '11 at 19:52
    
ok, got you. So if a certificate is installed at the load balancer, do I need to specify the details of the certificate in the wcf config file? – Xaisoft Jun 1 '11 at 20:07
1  
Well, I would expect that if somebody down votes the answer he would also point what is wrong or post his own correct answer. – Ladislav Mrnka Jun 1 '11 at 21:18

It doesn't. Don't bother with this. You will be in a world of hurt. Just install the certs on each machine. We've recently been through this fiasco. WCF is not worth the effort it thinks it needs SSL but sees that it doesn't have it. Take a look at openrasta or something else if you want to do all your SSL on the loadbalancer. #microsoftfail

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Interesting answer. Would be more interesting if someone could verify this? – Xaisoft Jun 1 '11 at 19:28
1  
I verified it plenty of times in a real system. Save your sanity and don't bother with WCF w/ SSL in a load-balanced scenario. – Adam Dymitruk Jun 1 '11 at 19:29
    
I asked a recent WCF MCP Cert'ed guy and he had no clue. Let's just say the scenario is not on the top of MS's list of what WCF should do. You might want to bug Glenn Block on Twitter if you REALLY want to get this working. Good luck. – Adam Dymitruk Jun 1 '11 at 19:32
    
Well, I can't use another framework, so I have to deal with WCF. – Xaisoft Jun 1 '11 at 19:34
2  
You are comparing completely different technologies. – Ladislav Mrnka Jun 1 '11 at 21:16

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