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What is the proper way of separating my meta-data from the HTML? As my projects grow bigger and bigger tying up meta-data with HTML becomes more and more messy. Any good alternatives?

Meta Data: Everything the JS needs to know about an HTML element which isn't straight-forwardly encoded in the HTML elements and their attributes. E.g. a geolocation, enabled, disabled action.

Example: Say I have a list of places I want to show up on a map whenever I click on one of them. How do I identify that exact same place in JS so I could tell the map 'hey, move to that location'? Easiest way, that becomes messy in the end, is to tie it into the HTML, say the li id will be the geolocation. That's easy, but it is a code smell. How do I do this properly? .data() in jQuery also becomes horrible to maintain soon afterwards.

Conclusion: that's it, I'm going to find/write good MVC for JS.

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3  
Pardon my ignorance, but what is it you mean by 'metadata'? –  stefgosselin Jun 1 '11 at 19:32
1  
Can you show an example of what you want? Ideally with a before and after? –  David Thomas Jun 1 '11 at 19:33
    
you talk about meta-tags? like Description and Author? I guess you would first need some server-side code such as PHP... HTML alone won't do it. –  ecchymose Jun 1 '11 at 19:36
    
Say I have a list of places I want to show up on a map whenever I click on one of them. How do I identify that exact same place in JS so I could tell the map 'hey, move to that location'? Easiest way, that becomes messy in the end, is to tie it into the HTML, say the li id will be the geolocation. That's easy, but it is a code smell. How do I do this properly? –  CamelCamelCamel Jun 1 '11 at 19:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you want to attach metadata to DOM elements then use HTML5 data- attributes or use jQuery's .data() method to do it programmatically.

Here's a real world example I just used it on that really helped. I sent a request to the server to upload a file and I get a JSON response with the File Name, Content Type, Size and a GUID. On the response I want to add a list item to show the file but I want to preserve the JSON data. Here's how I did it in the callback:

function(response) {
  $('<li>').text(response.fileName).data('metadata', response).appendTo('ul');
}

What's great about this is now the list item HAS all my metadata attached to it.

So I could do something like this and know everything about it:

var metadata = $('ul li:eq(1)').data('metadata');

alert(metadata.contentType);
alert(metadata.size);

//etc..

The implementations are really limitless.

ALSO, as of jQuery 1.4.3 .data() will automatically pick up the data- attributes in your HTML. So <div data-foo="bar"></div> can be immediately accessed in code using $('div').data('foo') //bar

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even with .data() stuff gets hairy real fast for apps of considerable size, .data() doesn't have any solid way to deal with all those 'states', you just need to remember all the different outcomes in your head. –  CamelCamelCamel Jun 1 '11 at 19:40
    
There's this: plugins.jquery.com/project/metadata –  CamelCamelCamel Jun 1 '11 at 19:42
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@Radagaisus JavaScript's scalability is pretty poor no matter what the solution. .data() is the best thing since slice bread. :) –  John Strickler Jun 1 '11 at 19:45
    
I don't know. Sometimes I have visions of a vast and magnificent architecture laid down in JavaScript. I can see it could happen, unfortunately for me it never did so far. –  CamelCamelCamel Jun 1 '11 at 19:48

Depends what kind of metadata. If it truly belongs with your HTML elements, that's a good place for it. There are a few ideas I can think of:

Put only basic keys on your html elements and query the server for it (return it in JSON format). This seems like bad design because the server has to remember / reassemble the state each time the client needs the metadata. The more state / work you can push to the client, the more scalable your design.

Pass back javascript objects with your HTML, in a non-executable script tag (like you would for client side templating).

Store it in local storage (client side database for HTML 5)

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