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For instance, is the access_token needed for producing an iFrame dialog different from that used for logging in? If so, which URL should I be using to get an access token to produce a feed dialog as an iFrame?

I asked this question because I tried manually producing an access token using the following URL (which I found in the docs)

https://graph.facebook.com/oauth/access_token? type=client_cred&client_id=CLIENT_ID&client_secret=CLIENT_SECRET

I received an access token back but when I use it like so:

 FB.ui({
                    method: 'feed',
                    name: 'Facebook Dialogs',
                    link: 'http://developers.facebook.com/docs/reference/dialogs/',
                    picture: 'http://fbrell.com/f8.jpg',
                    caption: 'Reference Documentation',
                    description: 'Dialogs provide a simple, consistent interface for applications to interface with users.',
                    message: 'Say something about the tickets you just bought',
                    display: 'iframe',
                    access_token: ACCESS_TOKEN; //access_token returned by the above URL
                },
                function(response) {
                    if (response && response.post_id) {
                    console.log('Post was published.');
                    } else {
                    console.log('Post was not published.');
                    }
                }
                   );

The facebook feed dialog will stay on the loading screen with 3 bars forever.

So am I requesting the wrong access_token? Why is the facebook dialog not loading?

Note: This is all in client side javascript.

share|improve this question

Yes, there are different types of tokens. Each token is assigned to a specific "user". The token allows you to access options as the "user". There are 2 different "users", a real and your application. You can request a token for your application so you can perform actions on behalf of users that granted you "off line" access. The one you are requesting is an application token, which isn't a real user.

share|improve this answer
    
couple of points to make it more accurate: 1) there are 3 differnt tokens for a user, app and a page. 2) offline_access permission is for user and not for app token. – Anatoly Lubarsky Oct 3 '11 at 0:48

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