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This query has become my nemesis over the past few years because I've never found a way to optimize it. Now my nemesis becomes your nemesis! :)

Consider the following table:

create table Sales (
  SaleId int identity(1,1) primary key,
  SalesmanId int not null,
  Amount smallmoney not null
)

For the sake of argument, assume that this table has 10^100 rows (business is brisk) and therefore a table scan is out of the question.

Now we want to determine the SaleId of each salesman's most recent sale. Simple enough, right? Here is the query for that:

select
  SalesmanId,
  max(SaleId) SaleId
from Sales
group by Sales.SalesmanId

When we run this query the query optimizer does a full table scan, which is expected because it has no way of knowing where each salesman's sales fall within the table. So let's help it out by adding the following index:

create unique nonclustered index IX_Sales on Sales
(
  SalesmanId asc,
  SaleId asc
)

Now it should be trivial (for a human, anyway) to find the most recent values because we use the values of the first column of the index to identify all possible salesmen and the last entries of the second column to locate each salesman's latest sale. Unfortunately, the query optimizer still does an index seek over the entire index (all 10^100 rows) in this case, so it takes just as long.

Interestingly, if we write the query to find the latest sale for a given salesman,

select max(SaleId)
from Sales
where SalesmanId = 1

the query optimizer uses an index seek on IX_Sales and gets it with one row of I/O. Even without IX_Sales, it does a clustered index scan that somehow gets it in one row of I/O (maybe using the table statistics?). But if we modify this to

select max(SaleId)
from Sales
where SalesmanId = 1
group by SalesmanId

or

select max(SaleId)
from Sales
group by SalesmanId
having SalesmanId = 1

we're back to a high row-count index seek over lots of rows (although less than if you'd omitted the filter altogether, again probably due to statistics).

So ... any ideas on how I could defeat my nemesis?

Update

Some have suggested joining against a table of possible SalesmanId values, like so

select Latest.*
from
(
  select 
    SalesmanId,
    max(SaleId) SaleId
  from Sales
  group by SalesmanId
) Latest
inner join Salesmen on 
  Salesmen.SalesmanId = Latest.SalesmanId

I tested this idea but the query optimizer still chooses to do a full table scan.

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What is your database engine? (SQL Server, MySQL, PostgreSQL, etc.) Which version? –  Andrew Jun 1 '11 at 20:03
    
SQL Server 2008 R2 –  Mike Jun 2 '11 at 3:49

5 Answers 5

Think outside the box. Whenever a sale happens, update a column in the salesman table to refer to the most recent saleid. We all fall to the normalization trap. Sometimes its better to be redundant. See CQRS for taking this to an extreme.

Hope this helps.

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Updating a column to track the most recent SaleId would help only until someone asked to change the query slightly (i.e. "What is the latest sale per salesman for amounts greater than $1,000?" or "What is the latest sale per salesman for each of the last 12 months?"). I'm looking for a more general-purpose approach that I can use for a whole class of queries that are similar to this one. –  Mike Jun 2 '11 at 4:16

Because you stated this this:

select max(SaleId)
from Sales
where SalesmanId = 1

Is fast, but the grouping is not... try putting that particular query in a view, then SELECT all the salesman and JOIN the view. That should force the the query plan on the view for each JOIN. Normally I wouldn't think this approach would be the most efficient, but given how your queries are processing it just might work.

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1  
I just tried this but got the same result. My experience with the query optimizer is that it combines all referenced Views into a single grand query before it optimizes, so I don't think you can trick it this way. –  Mike Jun 2 '11 at 4:19

Does the optimizer do better if you partition by SalesmanID (with appropriate per-table index and CHECK constraint on the table)??

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@Mike: If your optimizer was smart enough to treat a partitioned table as a human does, then it would be good on all per-salesman queries. So I don't think that comment applies. However, I tested my approach with PG 9.0, and using table inheritance for partitioning, it just doesn't work. If you ask about one table, index. Ask about even one salesman, table scan on the correct partition, where it could use index scan + limit. That strikes me as a mis-feature of the optimizer. –  Andrew Lazarus Jun 2 '11 at 5:00

" create unique nonclustered index IX_Sales on Sales ( SalesmanId asc, SaleId asc )

Now it should be trivial (for a human, anyway) to find the most recent values because we use the values of the first column of the index to identify all possible salesmen and the last entries of the second column to locate each salesman's latest sale. Unfortunately, the query optimizer still does an index seek over the entire index (all 10^100 rows) in this case, so it takes just as long."

Of course, but I bet you the computer still does it faster than a human being could.

Anyway, consider this other index declaration:

create unique nonclustered index IX_Sales on Sales
    (
      SalesmanId asc,
      SaleId DESC
    )

Now the MAX(SaleId) is the first row in the index for each Salesman. That should be a lot faster. You may think devoting an entire index to solving one query is pretty extravagant but defeating one's nemesis sometimes requires desperate measures!

I say solving just one query because this index won't help with those other queries you mention in a comment:

"What is the latest sale per salesman for amounts greater than $1,000?" or "What is the latest sale per salesman for each of the last 12 months?"

Alas, you cannot have a single solution to all your date-related queries on such a huge table. Solving these things is the reason why organisations build data warehouses, with baroque structures called dimensions and fact tables, and big grunt servers which can run queries in parallel.

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I just tried it and the query optimizer still does a seek of the entire index. The DESC probably would make it much faster for the human though. I have a feeling the computer would still win. –  Mike Jun 3 '11 at 3:16
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Ok I'm going to try answering my own question at the risk of offending the entire sql community with this approach.

declare @Result table (
  SalesmanId int not null primary key,
  SaleId int not null
)

declare @SalesmanId int
declare Salesman cursor local fast_forward for
  select SalesmanId 
  from Salesmen
open Salesman   
fetch next from Salesman into @SalesmanId

while @@FETCH_STATUS = 0
begin

  insert @Result (
    SalesmanId, 
    SaleId
  )
  select 
    @SalesmanId SalesmanId,
    max(SaleId) SaleId
  from Sales
  where SalesmanId = @SalesmanId

  fetch next from Salesman into @SalesmanId

end

close Salesman
deallocate Salesman

select *
from @Result

Before the cursors-are-bad flames begin, let's consider the performance. The complexity of the question's original question, which requires a table scan, is O(N) where N is the number of sales. The complexity of this proposed solution, since the query optimizer can find the answer for a given salesman in constant time, is O(M) where M is the number of salesmen. Assuming M << N (probably a safe assumption), this approach should be faster.

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