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this code in book jQuery in action page 131

i don't understand

.trigger('adjustName');

what is adjustName

and Simple explanation for trigger()

thanks :)

$('#addFilterButton').click( function() {
    var filterItem = $('<div>')
    .addClass('filterItem')
    .appendTo('#filterPane')
    .data('suffix','.' + (filterCount++));
    $('div.template.filterChooser')
    .children().clone().appendTo(filterItem)
    .trigger('adjustName');
});
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It is a string, the name of a custom event you defined.

E.g. it would trigger the event handler bound by:

el.bind('adjustName', function(){...});

For more information I suggest to have a look at the documentation:

Any event handlers attached with .bind() or one of its shortcut methods are triggered when the corresponding event occurs. They can be fired manually, however, with the .trigger() method. A call to .trigger() executes the handlers in the same order they would be if the event were triggered naturally by the user.


Without knowing the context of the code, I would say that calling .trigger() here has no effect, as it is called on the cloneed elements and the event handlers are only cloned if true is passed to clone.

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Maybe the original jQuery manual could be helpful?

Description: Execute all handlers and behaviors attached to the matched elements for the given event type.

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It allows you to trigger, or run, an event. For instance if you wanted the code to mimic the clicking of a button, you could write....

$("#myButton").trigger('click');

This would then run exactly as if you had clicked the button yourself.

'adjustName' is a custom event. So the trigger function is running that custom event. The custom event is assigned using the jQuery bind function.

$("#someElement").bind('adjustName', function() {/* Some Code */});

You might create a customer event for clarity. Perhaps your application opens a document, so you might want an event called 'openDocument' and 'closeDocument' assigned to the element containing the document.

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