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How do I handle properly a client Connection: close request field? As of now if I get this particular field I close the socket and wait for a following request from the client than reply again and start serving the data.

I don't know why my client/server communication is not working as the Apache Server I tested with.

Thanks for any clarifications...

Client/Server comunication:

CLIENT:
HEAD /stream.mpeg HTTP/1.0
Host: 127.0.0.1
User-Agent: SuperPlayer
Connection: Close

SERVER:
HTTP/1.0 200 OK 
Date: Wed, 1 Jun 2011 20:05:13 GMT
Server: HTTP Server
Last-Modified: Mon, 06 Aug 2009 01:02:23 GMT
Accept-Ranges: bytes
Connection: Close
Content-Type: audio/mpeg

CLIENT:
HEAD /stream.mpeg HTTP/1.0
Host: 127.0.0.1
User-Agent: SuperPlayer
Connection: Close

SERVER:
HTTP/1.0 200 OK 
Date: Wed, 1 Jun 2011 20:05:13 GMT
Server: HTTP Server
Last-Modified: Mon, 06 Aug 2009 01:02:23 GMT
Accept-Ranges: bytes
Connection: Close
Content-Type: audio/mpeg

231489172304981723409817234981234acvass123412323
21312hjdfaoi8w34yorhadl4hi8rali45mhalo3i,wmotw
345fqw354aoicu43yocq2i3hr

Client/ApacheServer Comunication:

CLIENT:
GET /test.mp3 HTTP/1.0
Host: 192.168.1.120
User-Agent: SuperPlayer
Connection: Close

SERVER:
HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Date: Wed, 01 Jun 2011 19:15:11 GMT
Server: Apache/2.2.16 (Win32)
Last-Modified: Thu, 29 Apr 2010 21:06:34 GMT
ETag: "14000000047049-4f75c8-4856680636a80"
Accept-Ranges: bytes
Content-Length: 5207496
Connection: close
Content-Type: audio/mpeg

...d.....<).0.. ..........<.@.. ( .h.$.J...1...i....A. ......c....a.9..!g.N...A. ........ ....>......|.......8....a......|..|N.............'>........?...C.....@..TJt.n .e...r.iL..#..IH...pR|.
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes closing the socket is the right action to take. If the client is using this header properly, they are closing the socket on their end once they receive your response.

What I'm noticing here is that your server is not returning a Content-Length header. Even though the client is issuing a HEAD request, based on the W3C proposal (sec. 9.4):

The metainformation contained in the HTTP headers in response to a HEAD request SHOULD be identical to the information sent in response to a GET request. This method can be used for obtaining metainformation about the entity implied by the request without transferring the entity-body itself. This method is often used for testing hypertext links for validity, accessibility, and recent modification.

The response to a HEAD request MAY be cacheable in the sense that the information contained in the response MAY be used to update a previously cached entity from that resource. If the new field values indicate that the cached entity differs from the current entity (as would be indicated by a change in Content-Length, Content-MD5, ETag or Last-Modified), then the cache MUST treat the cache entry as stale.

The key here is to make sure you're telling the client the size of the response without actually sending the data.

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Ah! I hadn't noticed the HEAD and GET. Well on my HTTP server I read the HEAD and GET requests but I'm not sure why when I used Apache server and capturing the data with Wireshark, I didn't get the HEAD request... Maybe somehow Wireshark didn't capture it? –  Jona Jun 1 '11 at 20:40
    
Actually I take that back! Yes, Wireshark did read the HEAD request... :) –  Jona Jun 1 '11 at 20:41
    
I'm ignoring the length field on purpose. Thanks to your post I noticed that there was actually a difference on the client two requests. One HEAD and the other GET. Now I'm able to read that and properly handle the client request. –  Jona Jun 1 '11 at 21:03
    
The header just means close the connection after sending the response. –  EJP Jun 2 '11 at 0:29
    
@EJP - that's the first thing I say in my answer. How is this worth a downvote in your opinion? –  AJ. Jun 2 '11 at 1:12
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May I ask why are you using http 1.0 in the request? There were no persistent connections in http 1.0, so the server is supposed to terminate the TCP connection after the response, whether you send Connection: close or not.

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Yes, you are correct I should leave it as http 1.1 to let the client know I support persistent connection. –  Jona Jun 1 '11 at 21:01
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The Connection: close header just means that the client is expecting you to close the connection after sending the response. That also absolves you of having to send a Content-Length: header.

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