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I'm implementing a c++-class representing a fraction. Here goes my code.

class Fraction
{
    public:
        Fraction(char i);
        Fraction(int i);
        Fraction(short i);
        Fraction(long int l);
#ifdef __LP64__
        Fraction(long long l);
#endif
        Fraction(float f);
        Fraction(double d);
        Fraction(double x, double y);

        Fraction operator +() const;
        Fraction operator -() const;

        Fraction& operator +=(const Fraction& other);
        Fraction& operator -=(const Fraction& other);
        Fraction& operator *=(const Fraction& other);
        Fraction& operator /=(const Fraction& other);

        bool operator ==(const Fraction& other);
        bool operator !=(const Fraction& other);
        bool operator  >(const Fraction& other);
        bool operator  <(const Fraction& other);
        bool operator >=(const Fraction& other);
        bool operator <=(const Fraction& other);

        operator double();
        operator float();

        static void commonize(Fraction& a, Fraction& b);
        void shorten();

        double getNumerator();
        double getDenominator();

        friend Fraction operator +(Fraction const& a, Fraction const& b);
        friend Fraction operator -(Fraction const& a, Fraction const& b);
        friend Fraction operator *(Fraction const& a, Fraction const& b);
        friend Fraction operator /(Fraction const& a, Fraction const& b);
        friend ostream& operator <<( ostream& o, const Fraction f);

    protected:
        double numerator, denominator;

};

I now have two little problems. Now trying to call

Fraction a(1, 2);
cout << (3 + a) << endl;

simply results in this error:

fractiontest.cpp:26: error: ambiguous overload for ‘operator+’ in ‘3 + a’
fractiontest.cpp:26: note: candidates are: operator+(int, double) <built-in>
fractiontest.cpp:26: note:                 operator+(int, float) <built-in>

All I'd really want is this:

explicit operator double();
explicit operator float();

But apparently, this doesn't work. I'd like these two cast-operators to be called iff I use the cast notation. For example Fraction f(1, 2); double d = (double)(f);

share|improve this question
5  
As described in "More Effective C++" by Meyers, you should think twice about overloading cast operators (and having non-explicit single-argument constructors). –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 1 '11 at 21:30
    
Thanks Oli. I know about the problem of having non-explicit single-argument (aka conversion-)constructors. Guess I should think again about the conversion operators. And I guess you cannot overload int::int(Fraction f) as int is a primitive type... –  Atmocreations Jun 1 '11 at 21:35
    
Do you really need the constructors for char, short and float? –  Roland Illig Jun 1 '11 at 21:44
    
@Roland: Hmm good one... float yes. The others aren't really necessary, they're there rather just for completeness ;) Thanks for pointing it out. –  Atmocreations Jun 1 '11 at 21:53
    
All those constructors are bad design. Just have one that takes one or two double's, and let the caller do the conversion if necessary. It has nothing to do with completeness, as you have failed to allow your class to be constructed from UDT's that can be converted to double or float, for example. And that's good: it's not your class's responsibility to cast any type to a double, it's responsibility is to act like a fraction. Also, why have floating-point numbers for the fractions components? Should they not be integers? tl;dr: Pick a type (or templatize your class) and ditch the others. –  GManNickG Jun 1 '11 at 22:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

By definition the conversion operators are implicit. You can't make them explicit.

The normal solution is named member functions to do the conversion. I think you could also create a specialized template method that would look just like a static_cast and call through to the explicit class method.

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See my comment on my answer regarding the explicit conversion operators, I'm currently searching through the C++0x FDIS. –  Xeo Jun 1 '11 at 21:41
    
Thanks, Mark. Therefore an "automatic cast" doesn't seem to be possible. Member function is okay and I know what the static_cast is... but could you give me a hint what you mean by the static_cast-method? –  Atmocreations Jun 1 '11 at 21:42

Remove the conversion operators and 3 + a should use your friend operator+ while implicitly converting 3 to Fraction via the implicit constructor Fraction(int i);.


Edit: On the case of the explicit conversion operators, C++0x specifically allows this:

12.3.2 [class.conv.fct] p2
A conversion function may be explicit, in which case it is only considered as a user-defined conversion for direct-initialization.

The C++03 standard doesn't specifically mention this.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your very fast response. This worked as I had that one before. But when I now want to "cast" it into a double, the only way would be to create a member-function which does so, right? This means it's not automatic... –  Atmocreations Jun 1 '11 at 21:34
1  
Or even better, define operator+(int, const Fraction &), and eliminate the equally unsavoury implicit constructors! –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 1 '11 at 21:35
    
@Atmo: Yes, either that or an explicit operator with manual casting: 3 + (int)a;. The member function is generally preferred because implicit conversions can be quite vicious. –  Xeo Jun 1 '11 at 21:36
    
@Oli: I think having implicit constructors for classes as this is perfectly fine, as anything else leads to much code duplication imho. –  Xeo Jun 1 '11 at 21:36
1  
@Xeo: I agree with the code duplication point (although that can be solved to an extent by defining operator+(int, const Fraction &) in terms of e.g. operator+(const Fraction &, const Fraction &)). But it's exactly this sort of class that is the canonical example of why implicit constructors can be bad, as they increase the number of ways to silently introduce difficult-to-spot typo-based bugs. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 1 '11 at 21:40

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