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print "content-type: text/html \n\n";   #The header
$file = "newtext.txt";
if (unlink($file) == 0) {
    print "File deleted successfully.";
} else {
    print "File was not deleted.";
}

This is some code I picked up from tizag. The part I don't understand is that the bool value for true is 1, and false is 0. So why is it when I successfully delete the file I'm checking to see if it returns a 0?

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1  
The lesson here: When in doubt, check perldoc. perldoc perlfunc was my best friend while learning, and still is, as it happens. –  TLP Jun 1 '11 at 21:59
2  
or at the command line perldoc -f unlink –  Joel Berger Jun 1 '11 at 22:21
    
Note to SO Perl regulars: this is the second time that tizag attracted attention in an aggravating way. Until someone can go through the site with a fine comb and point out all the errors and submit for correction, I have shitlisted this resource and recommend you do so, too. –  daxim Jun 3 '11 at 9:28

4 Answers 4

OK, nevermind my first response. This is from the perldoc for unlink:

Deletes a list of files. On success, it returns the number of files it successfully deleted. On failure, it returns false and sets $! (errno)

Proof that there is no such thing as a standard. Also proof that whomever wrote that code, unfortunately has a bug. Personally I would have expected 0 to mean success. If you look at the C syscall unlink, zero means success. Utter madness, I tell you.

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2  
this allows for the more readable version if (unlink('file')) { print "success" } else {print "failed"}, no its not the C equivalent, but Perl is not C, this is a common Perl idiom. –  Joel Berger Jun 1 '11 at 22:23
    
Anyone care to explain the downvotes? I do believe my answer is EXACTLY the same as everyone else. –  Chris Jun 2 '11 at 0:31
    
Aside from the whole "Well C does it this way so perl should too..." bit you mean. Scripting languages are better when they're not a thin veneer calling C functions; then you don't send up with messes like php's mysql_real_escape_string() leaking out into libraries. –  Oesor Jun 2 '11 at 11:29
    
Perhaps they shouldn't call it unlink then? –  Chris Jun 2 '11 at 13:34

Actually, I think that's a bug. From the perldoc for unlink:

On success, it returns the number of files it successfully deleted. On failure, it returns false and sets $! (errno)

Probably a shell programming on autopilot.

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The snippet can simply be wrong, cause unlink returns the number of files successfully deleted.

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That seems like a mistake.. from perldoc perlfunc:

Deletes a list of files. On success, it returns the number of files it successfully deleted. On failure, it returns false and sets $! (errno):

If the return value is 0, you deleted 0 files.

The correct way to write it would be:

if (unlink($file)) { print "Success!" }
else { print "Unlink failed: $!" }
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1  
And the more idiomatic unlink $file or die "unlink $file failed: $!". Use autodie to handle this for you. It ships with 5.10.1. search.cpan.org/perldoc?autodie –  Schwern Jun 2 '11 at 1:48

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